News:

Sign up for the monthly zoom events by sending a PM with your email address to Hitesh

Main Menu

Liberty on coins

Started by <k>, December 14, 2012, 03:11:20 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

<k>

#30
Guatemala 1 peso 1882.jpg

Guatemala, 1 peso, 1882.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#31
Guatemala 1 peso 1894.jpg

Guatemala, 1 peso, 1894.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#32
Honduras 25 centavos 1885.jpg

Honduras, 25 centavos, 1885.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#33
Mexico 1 peso 1914.jpg

Mexico, 1 peso, 1914.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#34
Peru 1 sol 1869-.jpg

Peru, 1 sol, 1869.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#35
Peru 5 pesetas 1880.jpg

Peru, 5 pesetas, 1880.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#36
Portugal 25 escudos 1980.jpg

Portugal, 25 escudos, 1980.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#37
Belgium.jpg

Belgium.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Switzerland, 5 rappen, 1884.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Switzerland, 20 francs, 1888.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#40
Venezuela 1 centavo 1862.jpg

Venezuela, 1 centavo, 1862.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild

#41
Quote from: <k> on August 13, 2020, 06:01:33 PM
Angola, 50 centavos, 1928.

Guess it is difficult and sometimes impossible to differentiate, but my impression has always been that this is "Lady Republic" rather than "Lady Liberty". For example, the 2010 Portuguese €2 coin commemorating the 100th anniversary of the republic shows pretty much the same head. (Guess they did not really want to put the central figure of this image on the coin. :) ) Another issue is that in 1928 (the date on the Angola coin) "liberty" was not really en vogue in Portugal any more.

Christian

<k>

Still, the woman on the Angolan coin is wearing the liberty cap. Liberty is a concept. Whether or not the government of Portugal in 1928 considered that they'd abandoned it.we cannot say.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

#43


#22




#36

Replies #22 and 36: No Phrygian cap or inscribed coronet in sight. Attribute looks like a laurel twig (victory), but might be olive (peace). In the second case the lady is Pax, but I think it is more likely that she is a personification of the country.






Reply #31: Attributes are cornucopia (abundance), scales (justice or trade) and broken shackles. The shackles do not refer to independence, which was declared in 1821, realised in 1841 but to the  Barrios revolution of 1876 (inscription on the pillar.) Though his government brought reforms, notably by separating church and state, Barrios was a military dictator. Here also, I think that in spite of the Phrygian cap, the figure is a personification of the state as the other symbols imply as much. Possibly influenced by French gold 20, 50 and 100 francs issued first in 1878.






Reply #35: This is Artemis, goddess of agriculture in the Greek pantheon. Probably heavily influenced by French 5 franc pieces on the same subject.

Peter

An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

stef

It is difficult to say what is the meaning of a portrait – Republic, Liberty, goddess or just a lady. One needs to find some reliable source. For example, you posted in another thread 1 gourde, 1881, Haiti. Usually it is described as "Liberté créole", but I couldn't find any evidence about that.

I found more information about the coin in reply #17 (Brazil, 2 centavos, 1967).




The portrait represents the Republic. The coin has two other symbols – a star representing the new capital Brazil and a wind rose referring to the role played by the currency in the national integration (who would have guessed that). The averse is designed by Benedito Ribeiro. Another Brazilian designer, Glória Dias, said in an interview (near the end) that Ribeiro has been inspired by the Brazilian actress Tônia Carrero.

I suppose that the coin in reply #16 (Brazil, 1 novo cruzado, 1989) also represents the Republic.