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Shilling token from Frome

Started by Figleaf, November 21, 2012, 10:49:58 PM

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Figleaf

A highly appreciated recent addition:

Davis Somersetshire 66

Obv: crowned bust of Edward I - Frome Selwood token for 12 pence
Rev: radiating cross. Upper bar: MESSrs / WILLOUGHBYs. Left bar: Mrs SINKINS / H. RYALL. Right bar: W. SPARKS / W. GERARD. Lower bar: GRIFFITH & / GOUGH. Around: ONE POUND NOTE GIVEN FOR 20 TOKENS. 1811.

According to Davis, Willoughby and sons were grocers; Mrs. Jane Sinkins was draper at Market place; Henry Ryall was grocer at Catherine hill; William Sparks and William Gerard were grocers at Market place; Griffith and Gough were grocers at Stoney street. It looks like a cabal of not overly rich people found a common interest in helping the public with change, while helping themselves to some seigniorage. Good for them.

Davis says the text on the upper bar starts with AT. It doesn't on my specimen.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

malj1

I would take a guess that the AT may be in the centre of the cross.

Here is a scan from Dalton's Silver tokens. Can't quite make it out....
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

FosseWay

Quote from: Figleaf on November 21, 2012, 10:49:58 PM
A highly appreciated recent addition:

Davis Somersetshire 66

Obv: crowned bust of Edward I - Frome Selwood token for 12 pence
Rev: radiating cross. Upper bar: MESSrs / WILLOUGHBYs. Left bar: Mrs SINKINS / H. RYALL. Right bar: W. SPARKS / W. GERARD. Lower bar: GRIFFITH & / GOUGH. Around: ONE POUND NOTE GIVEN FOR 20 TOKENS. 1811.

According to Davis, Willoughby and sons were grocers; Mrs. Jane Sinkins was draper at Market place; Henry Ryall was grocer at Catherine hill; William Sparks and William Gerard were grocers at Market place; Griffith and Gough were grocers at Stoney street. It looks like a cabal of not overly rich people found a common interest in helping the public with change, while helping themselves to some seigniorage. Good for them.

Davis says the text on the upper bar starts with AT. It doesn't on my specimen.

Peter

I take it you've noticed that the L in SELWOOD on yours is retrograde? Is that a known variety or have you stumbled on something peculiar? The one in Malcolm's catalogue scan has a normal L.

malj1

Quote from: FosseWay on November 22, 2012, 07:57:56 AM
I take it you've noticed that the L in SELWOOD on yours is retrograde? Is that a known variety or have you stumbled on something peculiar? The one in Malcolm's catalogue scan has a normal L.

I believe it is normal with perhaps a die flaw between the E - L.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

FosseWay

Looking closer, I see what you mean. It almost looks like an upside-down T.

translateltd

All the non-round letters have strong leftward serifs - look at the E's on the reverse, for instance.  The long serif at the left of the horizontal on the L in SELWOOD touches (or almost touches) the right extremity of the E.

Figleaf

Quote from: malj1 on November 22, 2012, 02:55:02 AM
I would take a guess that the AT may be in the centre of the cross.

I think you are right. There's something there anyway.

It looks like the engraver went a little bit overboard on that L. Look at the T in token for comparison. He probably thought it looked medieval.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.