Author Topic: Alamgir II, dam, Elichpur  (Read 1224 times)

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Offline ZYV

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Alamgir II, dam, Elichpur
« on: August 14, 2012, 12:57:12 PM »
KM#450.3
"Nizam coin" is written about the coin in the catalog. What does it mean?

As far as I can understand, there is name of Alamgir on the coin.
Please, tell what is written on obverse & reverse.
My publications on numismatics and history of Golden Horde  https://independent.academia.edu/ZayonchkovskyYuru

Offline Oesho

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Re: Alamgir II, dam, Elichpur
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2012, 09:48:15 PM »
Quote
"Nizam coin" is written about the coin in the catalog. What does it mean?
From about 1724, Nizam al-Mulk, the Mughal viceroy (Subadar) of the Deccan, took advantage of the Mughal decline in the North to assert an all but ceremonial independence of the emperor.

The rulers of the Deccan (Hyderabad) became to be known by their title of Nizam. The Nizams controlled a large territory and exercised authority over a number of feudatories or samasthans. Some of these exercised their own right to coin, like also Elichpur.

The prerogative privilege of coining had always been in name of the authority in Dehli and continued to be so until the last Mughal emperor was deposed (1857).
The coins were struck in the name of the emperor of Dehli, who didn't exercised any power.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Alamgir II, dam, Elichpur
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2012, 12:20:49 AM »
Great, this clears up some question marks I never had the time to investigate, notably why the Nizam was allied with the British. It also raises a new (but minor) question mark. I thought subadar was an army rank (sergeant). Memory failure 404?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

akona20

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Re: Alamgir II, dam, Elichpur
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2012, 12:35:32 AM »
Well you are not wrong Figleaf. A suda(h)dar is both a governor of a province and a rank for an Indian officer in the army in British India.

Derivation to Persian is the Arabic suba meaning province and dar meaning one holding. However some of these words in certain Mughal settings such as the transliteration of the word dar are being re investigated.

Offline Oesho

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Re: Alamgir II, dam, Elichpur
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2012, 12:44:56 AM »
Quote
I thought subadar was an army rank (sergeant). Memory failure 404?
During Mughal times a Subedar could be regarded as a governor of a Subah (province). In Akbar's time they were posted for a few years and than transferred to another Subah to prevent they would settle and become a danger to the empire. Exactly what happened during the time of the later-Mughals, when the policy of transfer ceased.
Ultimately the Subadars became or declared themselfs an independent Nawab, Wazir or Nizam.

akona20

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Re: Alamgir II, dam, Elichpur
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2012, 01:25:03 AM »
We have one of those annoying by plays in history surrounding the word Subahdar (and its various spellings).

The Webster dictionary reports its use from around 1698 and other sources remain relatively silent or the matter. Akbar had subahs as his regional divisions but were they in fact called Subahdars (sp) at the time or another word such as sipahsalar and that word has been replaced in translation to the perhaps later word subahdar (and its various spellings).

This will be considered a fine point of irrelevance by many however the use of various words and translation and transliteration within common phrases of groups of words can have a major bearing on the way specific points of view are looked upon. So if we look at the repeated transliteration of the term on many Mughal coins of "Badshah Ghazi" is it really correct and we must also look at the advised transliterations of the epithets. much of this work was done a long time ago when christian zeal and religious intolerance often formed the basis for work done rather than an unbiased approach based on fact rather than prejudice.