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Arrows on coins

Started by <k>, May 11, 2012, 11:34:53 PM

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<k>

Austrian Netherlands 1790 florin.jpg

Austrian Netherlands, 1 florin 1970.  Insurrection coinage.
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<k>

#1
Sweden, ¼ skilling, 1829.jpg

Sweden, ¼ skilling, 1829.
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<k>

#2
Falange_española_Yugo_y_flechas.jpg


Spain sm.jpg

The yoke and arrows were the symbol of General Franco's political movement, the Falange.

Spain, 25 centimos, 1937. 




Spain, 50 centimos, 1949.
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<k>

#3
UK 50 pence 2012.jpg

UK, 50 pence, 2012.  Olympics issue: archery event.
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<k>

#4
Monaco 1924.jpg

Monaco, 2 francs, 1926.
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<k>

#5
Mexico.jpg


USA 1c 1862.jpg

USA, 1 cent, 1862.
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chrisild

Quote from: <k> on May 11, 2012, 11:40:42 PM
Spain, 50 centimos, 1949.

This coin I find interesting for another reason. Note how, in the image you show here, the arrows point upward? When the coin was originally designed and minted (in early 1951), they pointed toward the bottom. Some people in Franco's government did not like that. So after making almost one million pieces, the design had to be modified ...

Christian

<k>

#7


Arrows pointing upwards.




Spain, 50 centimos, arrows pointing downwards.
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Arminius

Not a coin but a token:



(for changing the size of the depiction in your browser use the key combinations ctrl +/- )

North India, ca. 1792-1850 AD.,
Ramatanka (Hindu religious 'temple token' or votive piece, white metal or very debased silver) (23-24 mm / 10,95 g),
Obv.: Rama Sata - Rama Sata - Rama (in Gurumukhi legends) , the "Durbar scene": Rama and Sita enthroned below umbrella - held by Lakshmana facing monkey god Hanuman.
Rev.: Rama Nama (repeated four times in Gurumukhi legends) , Rama and his brother Lakshmana standing - each with bow and arrow.
cf. Mitchiner, Ramatankas, 4704 .

(Hope i got the correct translations.)
Maybe someone can provide a better reference?

:)

<k>

#9
Ionian Islands.jpg




Ionian Islands, 2 oboli, 1819.

See also this related topic: Ionian Islands
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Figleaf

#10
burgos.jpg

Here is a half real struck in Burgos in the name of Ferdinand and Isabella.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

izotz

#11
Quote from: <k> on May 11, 2012, 11:40:42 PM
Spain, 25 centimos, 1937.  The yoke and arrows were the symbol of General Franco's political movement, the Falange.

Quote from: Figleaf on May 15, 2012, 11:13:02 PM
Here is a half real struck in Burgos in the name of Ferdinand and Isabella.

Peter

As some of you may know, there is a strong relationship with both coins' symbols. In fact, yoke and arrows were chosen by Ferdinand and Isabella as a symbol for their government. If you take the first letters in Spanish : Yoke + Arrows = Yugo + Flechas. Which are the same initials for Ysabel (in ancient Spanish, that is Isabel) and Fernando.

So Franco at the begining of his government , claimed for him the inheritage of some symbols of ancient Spanish union.

Figleaf

Thanks, Izotz. You learn something every day. Indeed, the marriage of Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castile was the basis of the Spanish state and the Spanish monarchy (Franco considered himself an interim caretaker for the monarchy, a caudillo, not a presidente.) You will find that the yoke is for two animals, making it clear to the Castilians that there interests and ruler were taken seriously. The bundle of errors symbolized the parts of Spain that had come together, of course. Their message is that the co-operation would make all the parts stronger. All in all clever symbolism.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Arminius

Imagine - there had already been arrows on coins before medieval times:



Thebes in Boiotia, magistrate(s?) Laan.. (and The...?) , ca. 395-338 BC.,
Chalkus / Æ 14 (12-13 mm / 1,92 g),
Obv.: head of Herakles (youthful) facing right, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Rev.: ΛAAN / ΘE , Club left, below arrow left; all within incuse concave field.
BMC 8., p. 85, 176-177 ; Head, Boeotia p. 70, type b .

:)

<k>

#14
Mexico.jpg

Mexico, 5 centavos, 1882.
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