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Coins that offend

Started by Rangnath, March 26, 2008, 04:12:23 PM

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BC Numismatics

Don't forget about the old Euro coin reverses,which depicts Scandinavia like a penis.

The Italian coin that depicted the incorrect map of Germany was the bimetal 1,000 Lire.It is almost as common as the corrected version,which was also issued in 1997 & from 1998 to 2001.

Aidan.

chrisild

Well, the maps on the first euro circulation coins did not include Norway for example, since the "map" showed the then 15 member states only. And yes, Sweden does look a little phallic. ;D

Oh, and when it comes to ancient objects being (ab)used for modern politics, we should not forget the last Greek 1000 drachmes circulation coin. The piece depicts Alexander the Great and, on the other side, the Sun of Vergina. That sun or star symbol was found in Vergina, in the Greek province of Macedonia. The coin was first issued after the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia had become independent - but in order to keep the republic of Macedonia from using the Vergina Sun as its official emblem, Greece dated some of the coins back.

Too bad that Philipp and Alexander, or the medieval dukes of Carinthia, did not really care about where any of their symbols would be located in the Europe of the 21st century. ::)

Christian

Figleaf

#17
Quote from: chrisild on March 29, 2008, 01:07:08 PM
they merged West Germany and the Netherlands, instead of the FRG and the GDR

I had to look that up, of course. Hold on to your deck chairs :D:

1. The GDR was merged with Poland
2. Denmark, Luxembourg and the Netherlands are merged with Germany
3. Austria and Czechia are merged

While 2 and 3 are a question of missing borders, 1 is a plain wrong border. On the second issue, these problems are corrected. at the cost of a mangled Danish coast line. I suppose that Italians, like my mother, are much better at creating pretty things and excellent food than at reading maps.

Quote from: chrisild on March 29, 2008, 01:07:08 PM
Then there was the Slovenian 2 cent coin depicting the Prince's Stone http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince%27s_Stone which the governor of the Austrian state of Carinthia found offensive. He tried to cause a stir, then again that governor is a controversial figure anyway. ;D As a reaction to the stone being depicted on the piece from Slovenia, he ordered the stone to be moved from a museum in Klagenfurt (capital of Carinthia) to a prominent place in the state parliament.

Thanks, Christian. That was a new one for me. Maybe not as juicy as the diamond neckless but I can see why it would worry someone with Jörg's state of mind. There's a similar situation around the Stone of Scone. The Blarney stone is said to be part of it, but fortunately, at least that one remains in place (but then again, it's hard to move).

If you assume that the place where the king puts his tender bottom end during the coronation ceremony is as important as what's on his top end, the Hungarian crown, long in the US, now returned and a regular feature of Hungarian coins, would count as similar also.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Rangnath

I can imagine the stir it (the suggestive violence, the bad parental role model, the mammary glands  :o) would create in the "Land of the Free", the USA.  But in "provencial", conservative, Catholic Mexico?  No problem!
richie

translateltd

Quote from: Figleaf on March 28, 2008, 08:20:58 PM
While the rest of the world turned metric, Britain and the US did not. Neither country put numerical denominations on its coins (the US still doesn't) and the British kept "dei gratia", although in the course of time it lost all meaning. Taking it off the coins wasn't more than a really slight modernization. There's no evidence that it was controversial until the coin was issued and even then, it was a cause only for religious extremists. 
Peter

Couple of points to add there: the Maundy 1, 2, 3 and 4d have had numeric denominations since the reign of James II (an unbroken series from 1685 (or 86) to date, and "for circulation" threepence coins carried a number on the reverse from the 1830s to 1927, as did the three-halfpence for its lifetime, which may or may not have circulated in the UK, as recently discussed.

As for Godlessness, the 1848-49 florin wasn't the first British coin to omit D.G. or its variants, by a long shot: no copper coins between their reintroduction in 1672 and 1775 carried any reference to the King's divine right that I am aware of, and it was only restored to the copper coinage in 1797, fittingly at the time of the upheavals in France, though whether this is coincidence or not I have no idea.

Martin
NZ

Austrokiwi

HI Martin

Wasn't the issue with the godless florin more about people fighting against decimalization?  The godlesss aspect was only a further arrow in the traditionalists quiver!

Cheers Ian

Figleaf

While decimalization played a role, the "godless" aspect was an issue in itself that led a longer life. On the subsequent florin type, the gothic florin, the text "ONE TENTH OF A POUND" is also present. The traditionalists (I prefer "stick-in-the muds" >:D) won the removal of that text on the 1887 series, but lost on issuing the double florin or one fifth of a pound, which didn't have a chance anyway as long as the crown (one fourth of a pound) continued to be issued.

Speaking of decimalization, British decimal coins of the 1960s were found offensive as well. One letter-writer complained that "the queen has turned Her back on Her people", another noted the numerical values and concluded that "no doubt, this has been done to pull us down to continental level", saying that decimalization was "unneccesary, unwarranted and un-English". Take that! Not that proponents reacted any smarter. I remember a gushing interview with a real estate broker who for reasons known only to himself thought that there weren't any real estate brokers across the Channel and decimalization would help him conquer the continent.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Figleaf

And if genitals are considered offensive 1) never go to Florence to see Michelangelo's David and b) do not collect the coins of the Cook Islands. On several coins [5 cent (KM 369) 1 dollar (KM 7, KM 30, KM37 en KM 147)], you find Tangaroa, a local god of fertility and he sea, both extremely important for survival. Tanga, as his friends call him, appears everywhere on the islands, especially cut in wood. However, the sight of him (or parts of him) was evidently too much for high-placed people in London, as on other issues [5 dollar (KM 367) en 100 dollar (KM 25)] his private parts are censored.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

BC Numismatics

Martin,
The Canadian 1911 coinage also caused an outcry as well,as the Canadian public were very traditional prior to World War I.I've been informed that a Canadian 1911 50c. coin with 'DEI GRA' turned up in England a few years ago when a Canadian coin dealer discovered it.It sounds impossible,but I think it is more likely to be a mule coin with the Newfoundland 50c. obverse die being sent to Ottawa by mistake.

In India,the 1911 coins caused an uproar,as the elephant on the King's portrait looks like a pig,an animal that is considered to be unclean by both Hindus & Muslims.

Peter,
  As one who does collect Cook Islands coins,I can tell you that depicting the penis on a carving is a part of traditional Cook Islands Maori carving.It is also depicted on some New Zealand Maori carvings as well.

I recently picked up the Cook Islands 2000 F.A.O. & Millennium commemorative 5c. coin.My boss had bought them from the Cook Islands Treasury,who actually posted them from Avarua,for the 5c. face value.What a bargain for a large stainless steel coin!

Aidan.

africancoins

Here is the "pig" elephant on my India Quarter Anna of 1911.

Thanks Mr Paul Baker

Rangnath

Thanks for the close-up Africancoins!  It is rather beautiful isn't it?  Like a batik.
I freely admit to my cultural biases.  But, as for the Cook Island coin.. pleasant? peaceful? Powerful?  POW! The proffered preposterously pronounced private part pal Peter posted previously paralyzes popular perception precipitously.  >:D
richie

Galapagos

Quote from: Figleaf on September 23, 2008, 10:17:20 PM
And if genitals are considered offensive 1) never go to Florence to see Michelangelo's David and b) do not collect the coins of the Cook Islands. On several coins [5 cent (KM 369) 1 dollar (KM 7, KM 30, KM37 en KM 147)], you find Tangaroa, a local god of fertility and the sea, both extremely important for survival. Tanga, as his friends call him, appears everywhere on the islands, especially cut in wood. However, the sight of him (or parts of him) was evidently too much for high-placed people in London, as on other issues [5 dollar (KM 367) en 100 dollar (KM 25)] his private parts are censored.

Peter

I read the Royal Mint documents about this piece in the National Archives at Kew. A rather poor illustration was provided of James Berry's first attempt at rendering the god. He/she (Tangaroa is both male and female: note the pregnant belly) was portrayed in full frontal - but with nothing between the legs. The Cook Islanders were mightily offended by this, and Mr Berry was instructed to come up with a more authentic version.

translateltd

Interesting - I understood that Berry's first version of the "doodle dollar" (as it's affectionately known hereabouts) showed Tangaroa rather too well endowed, and facing the viewer, hence the somewhat reduced-scale side view that we have now.  Typically, I can't find any supporting reference now I want it!


BC Numismatics

Quote from: translateltd on September 25, 2008, 10:39:59 AM
Interesting - I understood that Berry's first version of the "doodle dollar" (as it's affectionately known hereabouts) showed Tangaroa rather too well endowed, and facing the viewer, hence the somewhat reduced-scale side view that we have now.  Typically, I can't find any supporting reference now I want it!



Martin,
  I do have the Cook Islands 'doodle 5 Cents' as well,which is the F.A.O. & Millennium commemorative coin that came out back in 2000.They are stainless steel,& slightly smaller than the current New Zealand 50c. coin in terms of size.The design is the same as on the Cook Islands $1 coins,which still uses the Tangaroa carving reverse.

Aidan.

Figleaf

Galapagos made my day, remarking that the little big guy is pregnant, a feat repeated only by Arnold Schwarzenegger. As a reward, here is what Tanga looks like full frontal.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.