Author Topic: Coin edge types  (Read 12997 times)

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Offline <k>

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Coin edge types
« on: February 26, 2012, 10:00:34 PM »
In the UK the modern pound coin was introduced in 1983 and always carries an edge inscription. The inscription on the first pound coin reads: "DECUS ET TUTAMEN", which is Latin for "An ornament and a safeguard"; this phrase refers to the edge inscription itself. Pound coins with a Welsh design usually have an inscription in Welsh. Some of the edges merely show a pattern: for instance the "Bridge series" of pound coins, dated 2004 to 2007.

I am curious about how many countries currently issue standard circulation coins with an edge inscription, whether in words or just a pattern. How long or short is the list? I keep my coins in albums, so it wouldn't be an easy exercise for me.
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Offline kena

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Re: Coin edge types
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2012, 10:13:15 PM »
UK £2 coins also have an edge inscription.

US President Dollar Coins and Sacagawea dollar coins have edge lettering.

The edge-incused inscriptions found on the eight 2007 and 2008 Presidential $1 Coins (George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, James Monroe, John Quincy Adams, Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren) include the year of minting or issuance (2007 or 2008), E PLURIBUS UNUM, IN GOD WE TRUST and the mint mark ("P", "D" or "S").

Beginning in 2009 with the William Henry Harrison $1 Coin, the inscription IN GOD WE TRUST moved to the coin's obverse (heads side), with the year of minting or issuance, E PLURIBUS UNUM and the mint mark remaining as edge-lettering.

Native American $1 Coins feature a distinctive edge and golden color, with edge-lettering of the year, mint mark and the inscription E PLURIBUS UNUM.

According to the US Mint.

Ken

Offline <k>

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Re: Coin edge types
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2012, 10:14:42 PM »
The US has gone modern? :o  I never knew that.
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Offline kena

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Re: Coin edge types
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2012, 10:15:50 PM »
According to Wikipedia - 2 Euro coins have edge letter.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2_euro_coins#Edges

Of course, our Euro friends need to confirm this.

Ken

Offline kena

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Re: Coin edge types
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2012, 10:18:24 PM »
The US has gone modern?
How could you since most of the dollar coins are sitting in Federal Reserve vaults....

Offline <k>

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Re: Coin edge types
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2012, 10:18:50 PM »
According to Wikipedia - 2 Euro coins have edge letter.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2_euro_coins#Edges

Ken

Interesting. An edge inscription is probably the last feature anyone thinks of, if at all. I did once find a "pound coin" with half of the Latin inscription from the English design coins and half from the Scottish designs. I can't remember how it read, apart from the fact that it made no sense. It was a forgery, of course.
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Coin edge types
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2012, 10:20:49 PM »
In Germany during the DM years, the 2 DM and 5 DM circulation coins had EINIGKEIT UND RECHT UND FREIHEIT, the first words of the national anthem, on the edge. Also, the 5 DM and 10 DM circulating ;) commems had issue-specific inscriptions.

Nowadays the €2 coins from all member states have text on the edge. In some cases it is a simple one such as 2s and stars, some have a motto (for Germany it is the words from above again, the Netherlands have GOD ZIJ MET ONS, as on the earlier gulden coins). The Swiss 5 fr circulation coins have DOMINUS PROVIDEBIT.

There are different types of edge inscriptions; the €2 pieces fr example have a combination of a milled edge and incused characters (which in my opinion makes the text hard to read). The Swiss Cu-Ni 5 fr coins used to have incused text (1968-81 and 1985-93; not legal tender any more) and raised lettering (1982-84, 1994-today) ...

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Coin edge types
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2012, 10:26:15 PM »
In Germany during the DM years, the 2 DM and 5 DM circulation coins had EINIGKEIT UND RECHT UND FREIHEIT...the Netherlands have GOD ZIJ MET ONS

I remember all this now! Strange the things that lurk in your inactive memory. Digressing slightly, back in 1979 the Isle of Man issued 50 pence Tynwald commemoratives with an incuse edge inscription - probably the only heptagons with an edge inscription.
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Coin edge types
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2012, 02:21:58 AM »
There may be other polygonal coins with edge inscriptions but I don't know of any. Did not even know about that IoM one. ;) By the way, here is a list (in German, but with images) of €2 coin edge "texts": http://www.zwei-euro.com/allgemein/randschriften.html

That list covers regular and special (commemorative) issues. What I find interesting is some of these inscriptions can be read either way. Some more info about German pieces: Even in the Deutsches Reich (whatever that country is called in English ...) they had them: "Gott mit uns" on the monarchy's 3M and 5M coins, "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" on the "Weimar" 3RM and 5RM coins, and "Gemeinnutz geht vor Eigennutz" on Nazi Germany's 2RM and 5RM pieces. (Some of the RM coins have issue-specific mottos instead.) The GDR used edge inscriptions on the 5M coins (and on the 5M/10M/20M collector coins) but those were limited to indicating the face value: "10 MARK" etc.

On coins from the Federal Republic of Germany it was and is common to use issue-specific edge inscriptions, e.g. a famous quote of the honored person. In 2002 an interesting variety was issued; the "documenta" coin with an otherwise dull design has the word "art" in nine different languages. (Image from Wikipedia)

And then there are those "games" that the mints play. ;) How many "E"s are in the motto "EINIGKEIT UND RECHT UND FREIHEIT"? Right, five. How many minting facilities are there in Germany? Yep, five. So one of the E's is a little different from the others, and that indicates the mint, regardless of whether there is a mintmark or not.

Christian

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coin edge types
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2012, 02:24:25 AM »
I don't think edge lettering is all that rare, but it's often reserved to high value coins. Many give the name of the country or issuing authority, sometimes you find weight and fineness or even the denomination on the edge. One fine day, when I can access my collection again...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Enlil

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Re: Coin edge types
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2012, 08:02:17 AM »
The Hong Kong $5 coin has a redded security edge with HONG KONG FIVE DOLLARS as lettering. Australia has none, neither do any other pacific state that I have seen.

Offline <k>

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Re: Coin edge types
« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2012, 11:56:52 AM »
I don't think edge lettering is all that rare, but it's often reserved to high value coins. Many give the name of the country or issuing authority, sometimes you find weight and fineness or even the denomination on the edge. One fine day, when I can access my collection again...

Peter

Good point, Figleaf. Subconsciously I probably knew that, but it's worth stating.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Coin edge types
« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2012, 11:57:55 AM »
The Hong Kong $5 coin has a redded security edge with HONG KONG FIVE DOLLARS as lettering. Australia has none, neither do any other pacific state that I have seen.

Thanks, Enlil. The HK $5 long had an interesting security edge, of course, starting in the days of British rule.
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: Coin edge types
« Reply #13 on: February 27, 2012, 12:37:38 PM »
I don't think edge lettering is all that rare, but it's often reserved to high value coins.

Often, but not exclusively.

The Egyptian aluminium 5 millim coin of 1967 (KM 410) has edge lettering (though I don't know what it says). I've often wondered why they bothered putting edge lettering on it given its very small value.

On the €2 coins: I think all of them have some form of edge design in addition to standard milling. The default is to have alternating stars and 2s, with each 2 upside down compared to those either side. As mentioned above some countries have a country-specific inscription, though without going and looking at some the only one that I can actually remember is EINIGKEIT... on German ones, as Christian mentioned.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Coin edge types
« Reply #14 on: February 27, 2012, 03:04:12 PM »
The Egyptian aluminium 5 millim coin of 1967 (KM 410) has edge lettering (though I don't know what it says). I've often wondered why they bothered putting edge lettering on it given its very small value.

Don't know why they did it, but that is the country name. On the 1967 issues (5 and 10m) you see the abbreviation of "United Arab Republic" in Arabic characters (three times). The 1972 issues say "Arab Republic of Egypt" instead, again abbreviated and three times.

Christian