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Flags on coins

Started by <k>, January 29, 2012, 11:31:06 AM

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<k>

Quote from: chrisild on January 31, 2012, 01:01:28 PM
Another flag, maybe even less obvious.

Christian

I'd never noticed those flags on the Austrian and French euros. I thought the Austrian one was meant to be part of some building. It is amazing how the knowledge of a little detail like that can make you look at a design in a different way. It reminds me of our topic on stars, and the time I first noticed that the seven-pointed star on the old Australian penny was the Commonwealth star, from the flag. Before then, I'd just thought it was an arbitrary part of the dersign, intended just to fill out the space.
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chrisild

#31
Ye, in quite a few cases only the locals (or avid collectors ;D ) know about such details. When it comes to euro coins, I think I know most of those elements, but in many other cases I can only guess, or have no idea ...

By the way, for those who prefer big waving flags, the Monnaie de Paris made the "euros des régions" collector coins. Each of the French regions was represented by its outline (map) and its flag on the 2010 series. (The 2011 "régions" series had characteristic buildings.) The coins could/can be had at face at selected post offices in the region. That is, the Bourgogne piece for example (attached) was available in Burgundy only, the Île-de-France coin was available in and around Paris, and so on. So collectors who want/ed them all would have to swap with others, or buy the "missing" pieces.

Christian

<k>

#32
Flags on coins, maps on coins, sprays/wreaths on coins. It fits into a lot of themes.

Easier and nicer to say Burgundy than Bo-Jonie or Boor-Goggnie, or however they pronounce that ugly-looking Bourgogne. The sooner we move to ELU (European Linguistic Union), with French phased out, the better.
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chrisild

The side that has the face value is the same for all pieces of that series, by the way. And you may have guessed that the multiple hexagons on that side are no coincidence; France very roughly resembles a hexagon and is therefore sometimes called "L'Hexagone".

Language wise, we Europeans love our diversity. And when it comes to names of regions, well, Bourgogne is pretty easy and straightforward to prounounce. Try Anstruther instead. :P

Another flag - this time it's Portugal. This collector coin was issued in 2006 to commemorate 150 years of Portuguese railways, and the armillary sphere is depicted on most coins from Portugal, so the designer probably thought, why not show it how it is displayed on the flag? The coin design seems to suggest that the two color fields (green on the "left", red on the "right") have the same width. Well, on the actual flag the red field is twice as wide as the green one.

Christian

villa66

Quote from: chrisild on January 31, 2012, 04:02:51 PM
...And you may have guessed that the multiple hexagons on that side are no coincidence; France very roughly resembles a hexagon and is therefore sometimes called "L'Hexagone"....

Thanks for this. I had no idea.

:) v.

chrisild

It's one of those things that cannot be recognized easily - if you see a (more realistic) map of France on a coin, you will probably say, ah, France. :) But a geometrically precise hexagon, weeelll ... Anyway, you may well have seen it on coins before: Attached are a 1 franc coin that commemorates 30 years of the "Fifth Republic", and a 1 euro circulation coin; the €2 coin has basically the same design.

Christian

chrisild

#36
Ah, I forgot this is the flags topic. :) Here are the Polish and Lithuanian flags on an oval collector coin that commemorates the battle of Grunwald in 1410.

Christian

<k>

#37
2011 Britannia £2.jpg

It is one of the seven wonders of the world that the map of Great Britain is shaped exactly like Britannia.

Here she is with the Union Jack.
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<k>

#38
Algeria, 1 dinar, 1964.jpg

Algeria, 1 dinar, 1964.
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<k>

#39
g57.jpg

Surinam, 10 gulden 1976. 

First anniversary of independence.
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<k>

#40
Malaysia.jpg

A gigantic Malaysian flag fluttering in the sky.
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<k>

#41
Rwanda, 200 francs, 1972: 10th Anniversary of Independence. Two men shake hands in front of the Rwandan flag.



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<k>

#42


Guernsey, Commonwealth Games, 1986.

The flag of Guernsey appears in the centre of the coin.
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<k>

#43


Cyprus UN commemorative, 1995.  Flags depicted as leaves.
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chrisild

This $1 collector coin, issued in 2005, commemorates the 230th anniversary of the US Marine Corps. The depicted scene (US flag raised at Iwo Jima) became famous as a photo - the original or first photo was less "dramatic" though - and is the central part US Marine Corps War Memorial, between Washington DC and the Arlington cemetery.

Christian