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Stars on coins

Started by <k>, December 04, 2011, 05:25:35 PM

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<k>

Quote from: villa66 on December 05, 2011, 05:34:57 AM
Here is a single coin that shows American coin iconography evolving from what had been its traditional six-pointed star to the five-pointed star of the present day.

:) v.

Was there any significance in the number of points on the star? And was a there a reason for the change? I can imagine the field day that various loopy anti-semitic conspiracy theorists would have had if the US had continued with the six-pointed star.  ;D
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<k>

#16
This star appeared on the reverse of all Ghana's first coins after independence. It is the African star of freedom, and it appears on the Ghanaian flag.
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villa66

Quote from: coffeetime on December 05, 2011, 03:25:12 PM
Was there any significance in the number of points on the star? And was a there a reason for the change? I can imagine the field day that various loopy anti-semitic conspiracy theorists would have had if the US had continued with the six-pointed star.  ;D

Speaking strictly from memory, the reason(s) as it(they) relate(s) to coinage seem somewhat unclear, but one conjecture that I have read was that the five-point star simply seemed more modern, and also (and more persuasively) I have heard it mentioned that the five-point star was in the Washington family's coat-of-arms, and found its way into American flag, coin, and various official iconographies thereby.

:) v.

villa66

#18
Quote from: chrisild on December 05, 2011, 09:39:43 AM
The fairly obvious one is fifty stars representing fifty states. But maybe each star represents a value of 1 cent too? ;)

1) A circle of fifty stars for fifty states, exactly as chrisild says. And interesting thought about the 50 stars for 50 cents, but that's only a coincidence (15, 16, 46 and 48 stars have also appeared on American coins representing the current number of states in the Union); and

2) another set of thirteen stars for the 13 original states, as is very often found on U.S. coins; but

3) Note the grouping of the 13 stars (9 above the eagle's head, and 4 to the right of the head)—symbolic of the first 9 states to ratify the Constitution, that being the number needed to give the document effect.

:) v.


malj1

Two different friends both came back from a holiday in the Cook Islands with a gift of one of these coins featuring Tangaroa, a Male Fertility God. I wonder why?

[also another of the coins to feature stars]
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

malj1

#20
And the second version - 16th FORUM 2nd P.I.C. & MINI GAMES 1985

Both taken from circulation. But not really related to the pound - now. Until 1967, the New Zealand pound was used on the Cook Islands, when it was replaced by the New Zealand dollar. In 1972, coins were issued specifically for the Cook Islands.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

<k>

Quote from: malj1 on December 10, 2011, 11:46:34 AM
Tangaroa, a Male Fertility God.

Actually a hermaphroditic fertility god. S/he is clutching a pregnant belly.  :D
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chrisild

Quote from: villa66 on December 07, 2011, 05:29:34 AM
3) Note the grouping of the 13 stars (9 above the eagle's head, and 4 to the right of the head)—symbolic of the first 9 states to ratify the Constitution, that being the number needed to give the document effect.

Ah, that is interesting, thanks - I had no idea about this significance. Sure, I know what the 13 stars represent, but had thought that the "distribution" on the JFK Half was kind of arbitrary. Well, live and learn ... 8)

Christian

Arminius

The ancient mints had stars (and other heavenly bodies) too:



The Arsacid Kingdom of Parthia, Orodes II., Ecbatana mint, 57-38 BC.,
AR Drachm (17-20 mm / 3.97 g).
Obv.: diademed bust left, wart on forehead, neck torque ends in sea horse; star before, crescent above star behind.
Rev. above: BAΣIΛEΩΣ / BAΣIΛEΩN ; on r.: AP-ΣAKOY ; in ex.: EYEPΓETOY / ΔIKAIOY ; on l.: EΠIΦANOYΣ / [Φ]IΛEΛΛHNO[Σ] , archer (Arsakes I) seated right on throne, holding bow; anchor behind, AΓ T (Ecbatana) monogram below bow.
Sellwood 48.9; Shore 261; BMC Parthia pg. 90, 185 (Orodes I) ; Sear GC 7445 .

;D

<k>

#24
Cuba 1 peso 1939.jpg

Cuba, 1 peso, 1939.


Cuba's old coins carry a lot of stars.

I understand that this is the white star, symbolising independence from the Americans Spanish.

It is taken from Cuba's flag.
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chrisild

Quote from: izotz on December 05, 2011, 10:30:53 AM
Later, on Franco and Juan Carlos I pesetas, it was used to include the year when the coin had been minted on the reverse, while the year on the obverse stated the year when the design had been approved

They stopped doing that 30 years ago. Much easier for the eyes now. :) And as for the older pieces, in a few cases (such as the 1 peseta 1871) the "star date" was not even the production year ...

Quote from: coffeetime on December 29, 2011, 09:06:41 PM
Cuba's old coins carry a lot of stars. I understand that this is the white star, symbolising independence from the Americans, that is taken from its flag.

Originally it meant independence from Spain. But in later years the significance may have "shifted". :)  The current centavo circulation coins (not the convertible peso coins) have pretty much the same design, with Roman numerals in a circle.

Christian

Abhay

#26
The Pagoda Coins from East India Company - Madras Presidency.

Abhay
INVESTING IN YESTERDAY

$$

Hyderabad mint 10 rs coin with star mark and many other in low denomination.

Samir
S
  S
     S

<k>

#28


Brazil, 25 centavos, 1998.


The large star often seen on the coins of Brazil is taken from the Brazilian coat of arms. Within that star, the smaller stars represent the constellation of the Southern Cross, used as a national symbol also by Australia, New Zealand and other Commonwealth Countries of Australasia and Oceania.
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villa66

Quote from: coffeetime on December 30, 2011, 03:21:54 PM
The large star often seen on the coins of Brazil is taken from the Brazilian coat of arms. Within that star, the smaller stars represent the constellation of the Southern Cross....
The "cruzeiro" itself is also a reference to the constellation, or so I've read.

:) v.