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Netherlands 1 cent 1958 Double dies..

Started by $and€r, October 06, 2011, 11:53:11 PM

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$and€r

As some sort of error/variety world coin collector, I'm question myself, did I found something? Normally I don't find such errors on dutch coins.. But today 2 different double dies.. The separation at the serifs are clear.. Maybe they had some problem in 1958.. Any thoughts?
Guess they should had been US coins for some premium.. ;)

Figleaf

Not something I'd even notice before splashing a big picture on the screen. Maybe there are more, but no one ever noticed?

The doubling seems pretty local. In fact, one early option I thought of was re-cut die. However, I think you are right to call it doubling. My best theory would be that the pressure of the press had been set somewhat too high, causing an "echo" effect.

Maybe the best visual illustration of this effect is three metal balls hanging against each other free on threads. Move one away and let it drop against the other two. The middle ball will not react, the other outer ball wil move away and come back. Again the middle ball will not be affected, etc. Likewise, the force of the blow will travel from the die through the coin to the other die, which would be lifted for a split-second to produce the shadow effect.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Prosit

My gut feeling is the "bounce" is too pronounced to be a bounce.  I would stick with the idea of a repunched date.
In the US repunched mintmarks are...well...in my opinion common.  Would be interesting to discover that the date is added to the die and not from the master hub.  That makes a repunched date more plausible at least I think it does.  :)
Dale


Quote from: Figleaf on October 08, 2011, 01:58:40 AM
The doubling seems pretty local. In fact, one early option I thought of was re-cut die. However, I think you are right to call it doubling. My best theory would be that the pressure of the press had been set somewhat too high, causing an "echo" effect.
Peter

Figleaf

The doubling is in both pictures in the word CENT. In the date, maybe only the 8 is slightly affected.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Prosit

Yeah you are right...I mis-wrote my comment which is what i get from not looking at the coin as I wrote it but only from memory....old age setting in I guess.
Dale

Quote from: Figleaf on October 08, 2011, 02:22:32 AM
The doubling is in both pictures in the word CENT. In the date, maybe only the 8 is slightly affected.

Peter

$and€r

Thanks for the replies..

QuoteMy best theory would be that the pressure of the press had been set somewhat too high, causing an "echo" effect.

I'm quite convinced that the doubling already existed on this particular die.. Somehow in the process of making the die, it moved a little bit what caused this doubling.. I'm not exactly familiar how all the steps are of making a die, but I've seen strange doubling what already exists on the die.. An example is this 5 Stotinki 1962 Bulgaria, only a few bits of the lion are double..



Globetrotter

That Bulgarian coin is really strange?

$and€r

Hi Ole,
I have at least another 30 coins with this kind of doubling on Bulgarian coins..
All happened when making the die.. At the moment i have zero time to dig them up..