Author Topic: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992  (Read 14315 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32 399
Re: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992
« Reply #15 on: September 25, 2011, 11:00:20 AM »
An interesting feature of Czech coins is the lion with the double tail. This device has been used on the coins of for centuries and is particular to the region. It is a very handy way to identify older coins older coins, like this 15th century Prager groschen.

Peter

An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline bigr

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 42
    • COINS/MÜNZEN/МОНЕТЫ
Re: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992
« Reply #16 on: September 25, 2011, 11:13:35 AM »
50 HALERU 1952 (KM # 32)


Al, 18 mm, 0,6 g - The Czech catalogue (In KM the weight is absent)
Obverse: Czech lion with Slovak shield, date below
Reverse: Linden branches and wheat springs bound with ribbon
Edge: Plain
Author: Otakar Spaniel (Czech – Otakar Španiel)
Mintage - 60 000 000 coins.
Years of stamping – 1951-1953.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2011, 05:18:57 AM by bigr »

Offline bigr

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 42
    • COINS/MÜNZEN/МОНЕТЫ
Re: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992
« Reply #17 on: September 25, 2011, 11:53:55 AM »
... I find the most difficult Czech coin is the 5 korun 1952 (KM34.) Why is it so hard to get?
...

Peter
Data about 5 korun KM # 34 from the Czech catalogue:



"nevydana mince" – The coin was not issued

1951 RRRR (very rare) /F/ sample

1952 RR (rare) /F/

F – Attention falsification

Igor

Offline bigr

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 42
    • COINS/MÜNZEN/МОНЕТЫ
Re: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992
« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2011, 03:29:10 AM »
1 KORUNA 1946 (KM # 19)


copper-nickel (80+20), 21 mm, 4,5 g - The Czech catalogue (In KM the weight is absent)
Obverse: Czech lion with Slovak shield, date below
Reverse: Woman with sheaf and sickle, denomination at left
Edge: Milled
Author: Otakar Spaniel (Czech – Otakar Španiel)
Mintage - 88 000 000 coins.
Years of stamping – 1946-1947.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2011, 05:19:24 AM by bigr »

Offline bigr

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 42
    • COINS/MÜNZEN/МОНЕТЫ
Re: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992
« Reply #19 on: September 27, 2011, 03:38:55 AM »
1 KORUNA 1952 (KM # 22)


Al, 21 mm, 1,34 g (KM) (1,3 g – The Czech catalogue)
Obverse: Czech lion with Slovak shield, date below
Reverse: Woman with sheaf and sickle, denomination at left
Edge: Milled
Author: Otakar Spaniel (Czech – Otakar Španiel)
Mintage - 101 105 000 coins.
Years of stamping – 1947-1953.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2011, 05:19:46 AM by bigr »

Offline bigr

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 42
    • COINS/MÜNZEN/МОНЕТЫ
Re: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992
« Reply #20 on: September 27, 2011, 03:50:13 AM »
2 KORUNY 1947 (KM # 23)


copper-nickel (80+20), 23,5 mm, 6 g – The Czech catalogue (In KM the weight is absent)
Obverse: Czech lion with Slovak shield, date below
Reverse: Juraj Janosik bust right, wearing hat, denomination at right
Edge: Milled
Author: Josef Wagner
Mintage - 20 000 000 coins.
Years of stamping – 1947-1948.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2011, 05:20:07 AM by bigr »

Offline villa66

  • Meritorious Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 718
Re: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992
« Reply #21 on: September 27, 2011, 04:59:59 AM »
I'm reading your thread with interest...nice! I won't interrupt and will save my questions about Czech coins for later.

 ;) v.

Offline bigr

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 42
    • COINS/MÜNZEN/МОНЕТЫ
Re: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992
« Reply #22 on: September 27, 2011, 06:37:38 AM »
I'm reading your thread with interest...nice! I won't interrupt and will save my questions about Czech coins for later.

 ;) v.

Thanks. OK.

Igor

Offline bigr

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 42
    • COINS/MÜNZEN/МОНЕТЫ
Re: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992
« Reply #23 on: September 27, 2011, 07:39:12 AM »
1 HALER 1954 (KM # 35)


Al, 16 mm, 0,49 g (KM) (0,5 g – The Czech catalogue)
Obverse: Czech lion with Slovak shield, date below
Reverse: Large denomination within linden wreath, star above
Edge: Plain
Author: The author unknown (USSR)
Mintage - 188 885 000 coins.
Years of stamping – 1953-1960.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2011, 05:20:34 AM by bigr »

Online Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32 399
Re: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992
« Reply #24 on: September 27, 2011, 10:31:00 AM »
The communist authorities were quite secretive on mintage statistics. They wanted to hide that their economies were not going well, while in Western Europe, the Wirtschaftswunder was improving life rapidly. Therefore, dates on coins were frozen and mintage figures were treated as state secrets.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline bigr

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 42
    • COINS/MÜNZEN/МОНЕТЫ
Re: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992
« Reply #25 on: September 27, 2011, 11:33:40 AM »
3 HALERE 1953 (KM # 36)


Al, 18 mm, 0,65 g (KM) (0,6 g – The Czech catalogue)
Obverse: Czech lion with Slovak shield, date below
Reverse: Large denomination within linden wreath, star above
Edge: Plain
Author: The author unknown (USSR)
Mintage - 90 001 000 coins.
Years of stamping – 1953-1954.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2011, 05:21:08 AM by bigr »

Offline chrisild

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8 930
  • NW · DE · EU
Re: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992
« Reply #26 on: September 30, 2011, 10:58:39 AM »
Therefore, dates on coins were frozen and mintage figures were treated as state secrets.

As for the frozen dates, the Federal Republic of Germany did that too (with Pfennig coins), until 1966. ;) And mintage figures are apparently still "secret" in some countries (e.g. Romania) today ...

Now the double tailed lion, remember that last year the Czech Republic and Luxembourg commemorated Jean and Elisabeth (wedding 1310) on a common issue? Well, both coins have the lion with the double tail ... because the lion in Luxembourg's CoA has a double tail too. Apparently that is a heraldic reference to ruling two territories; in the case of Luxembourg for example the second tail was added about 800 years ago when Walram was the ruler of Luxembourg and Limburg. Not sure whether the tail has a similar meaning in the case of Bohemia.

And you find that lion version elsewhere too. The Duchy of Berg used it (also on coins), and if you look at the CoA of the city of Düsseldorf (which used to be the capital of Berg), you will see a double tailed lion even today.

Christian

Offline bigr

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 42
    • COINS/MÜNZEN/МОНЕТЫ
Re: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992
« Reply #27 on: October 03, 2011, 09:13:48 AM »
5 HALERU 1955 (KM # 37)


Al, 20 mm, 0,8 g – The Czech catalogue (In KM the weight is absent)
Obverse: Czech lion with Slovak shield, date below
Reverse: Large denomination within linden wreath, star above
Edge: Plain
Author: The author unknown (USSR)
Mintage - ? coins.
Years of stamping – 1953-1954.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2011, 05:21:39 AM by bigr »

Offline bigr

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 42
    • COINS/MÜNZEN/МОНЕТЫ
Re: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992
« Reply #28 on: October 07, 2011, 08:17:42 AM »
10 HALERU 1953 (KM # 38)


Al, 22 mm, 1,175 g – The Czech catalogue (In KM the weight is absent)
Obverse: Czech lion with Slovak shield, date below
Reverse: Large denomination within linden wreath, star above
Edge: Milled
Information KM – Leningrad Mint – 133 notches in milled edge; Unknown Mint – 125 notches in milled edge.
Information the Czech catalogue – Leningrad Mint – 139 notches in milled edge; Kremnica Mint – 130 notches in milled edge.
Author: The author unknown (USSR)
Mintage – KM - 160 000 coins (Leningrad Mint); The Czech catalogue – in all 375 051 000 coins.
Years of stamping – 1953-1958.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2011, 05:22:01 AM by bigr »

Online Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32 399
Re: Currency of Czechoslovakia 1918-1992
« Reply #29 on: October 08, 2011, 12:03:03 AM »
remember that last year the Czech Republic and Luxembourg commemorated Jean and Elisabeth (wedding 1310) on a common issue? Well, both coins have the lion with the double tail ... because the lion in Luxembourg's CoA has a double tail too. Apparently that is a heraldic reference to ruling two territories; in the case of Luxembourg for example the second tail was added about 800 years ago when Walram was the ruler of Luxembourg and Limburg. Not sure whether the tail has a similar meaning in the case of Bohemia.

John the Blind (1296-1346) was "elected" king of Bohemia in 1310. He used a quartered shield with Bohemia (double tail lion on a red field) and Luxembourg (single tail lion on white and blue bars) field. The double tail lion disappeared after his death, even though another three rulers succeeded John in Luxembourg and Bohemia. All three were also emperors of the Holy Roman Empire, a much more important title. Subsequently, Luxembourg became a minor possession of important royal houses and the Luxembourg arms disappeared altogether from the arms of its rulers. The Luxembourg lion seems to have been replaced by the Bohemian lion by the house of Nassau-Weilburg in 1890.

Or maybe not. On medieval coins, the Bohemian lion shows up on the coins of Luxembourg from the reign of John the Blind, but never on a striped background. It disappears after 1388. The Luxembourg arms with the Bohemian lion appears on the Luxembourg coins of 1917, but it is last shown on the 25 centimes 1954 (issued until 1972.) However, on the 100 francs and the 2 euro 2010, I think I see the quartered shield of John the Blind again! In addition, I can't make out what kind of tail the lion has under the Austrian kings and queens. On a 6 sols 1775 in my collection, the lion seems double-tailed, but I am not sure.

Conclusion: the double-tailed lion is used on the Luxembourg arms at least from 1917 to 1954, at maximum from 1713 to date.

And you find that lion version elsewhere too. The Duchy of Berg used it (also on coins), and if you look at the CoA of the city of Düsseldorf (which used to be the capital of Berg), you will see a double tailed lion even today.

Interesting. I found no connection between Berg and Bohemia. It may be a mix-up with the arms of Limburg, as Limburg ruled Berg 1218-1348. The Limburg lion has a double tail, but the two tails are not intertwined.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.