Author Topic: Coin nicknames  (Read 15920 times)

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Offline Globetrotter

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #30 on: December 18, 2015, 10:59:22 PM »
.... and I wonder what Ms. Moneypenny used as small change ....

Ole
Ole

If you're interested in coin variants please find some English documentation here:
https://sites.google.com/site/coinvarietiescollection/home
and in French on Michel's site (the presentations are not the same):
http://monnaiesetvarietes.esy.es/

Offline constanius

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #31 on: December 23, 2015, 01:29:26 AM »
Canadian 1 dollar coin is commonly called a looney, after the loon(a bird) on it.  The tooney is the $2 coin.

Pat

Pat

Offline Gusev

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #32 on: January 30, 2016, 09:28:39 PM »
In Ukraine is also very interesting system of nick names.

........For the dollars it can be used word Zelen' which mean green or Bucks...........
There is one more interesting name of the dollar - "kapusta" (cabbage).
Sometimes the officials for his work taking bribes. This is called a "cutting kapusta". ;D

More than 150 years of any paper money are called "babki" (grandmother).
This is a very old story. In 1866 was released 100 rubley banknote.
On the banknote was depicted of Ekaterina II. This banknote called "tsarskaya babka" (the royal grandmother). Then began to called all the banknotes "babki" (grandmother).
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Gagarin_Andrey

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #33 on: January 31, 2016, 03:19:21 PM »
Yeah, that's what I have forgotten ))

All it seems to be born in the crime speach, but commonly is being used among people and on TV.

''Lave'' (the accent on the last 'e') also can mean "money" because of english world "love" reffering on the love for sale and money
Interests: Eastern Europe Middle Ages coins

My articles about numismatics
https://independent.academia.edu/AndreiBoikoGagarin

Online Figleaf

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #34 on: February 01, 2016, 10:38:34 AM »
.... and I wonder what Ms. Moneypenny used as small change ....

She invested in Government Bonds.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Globetrotter

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #35 on: February 01, 2016, 11:39:18 AM »
and I only thought there was one bond, the one and only.....

Ole
Ole

If you're interested in coin variants please find some English documentation here:
https://sites.google.com/site/coinvarietiescollection/home
and in French on Michel's site (the presentations are not the same):
http://monnaiesetvarietes.esy.es/

Offline gerard974

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #36 on: February 01, 2016, 02:42:25 PM »
hello
on my island the old persons call the 5 franc coin (1948/1974) gros jack but nobody know why ?
best regards  Gerard

Online Figleaf

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #37 on: February 01, 2016, 04:28:43 PM »
Gros Jack/Big Jack just means "THE big coin". The large silver 5 francs was a standard coin in territories from French Indo China to Gabon. The British had to cope with this in occupied French colonies, especially during the Napoleonic wars. Islands like Madagascar were threatening the sea lanes between Britain and India, so, one by one, they were secured. Those 5 franc pieces were valued at 4 shillings and often the largest coins in circulation. In English, Jack can mean nothing in particular, similar to machin-truc-chose in French, as in "you don't know Jack" or "Jack of all trades".

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline nembiak

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #38 on: February 12, 2016, 02:43:17 PM »
The Dutch have certainly left a mark in my part of the world. We still refer to "money" as "duit" in Malay.
The Northern Malay states, which have their own unique Malay dialects, have various names for different denominations that I have difficulty understanding myself.

In terms of nicknames, the older Malay speaking collectors still refer to various silver dollars by rather odd names:

Netherlands 2 1/2 Guldens
King William I - Ringgit Kepala (literally "Head" money)
King William II - Ringgit Tengkorak ("skull" money)

Spanish Pillar Dollars - Ringgit Meriam ("cannon" money due to the shape of the pillars)
Mexican Peso - Ringgit Garuda/Burung ("Garuda/bird" money)

Online Figleaf

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #39 on: February 13, 2016, 03:32:53 PM »
Some amazing information nembiak...

Ringgit Kepala - the KWI rijksdaalders did not circulate much. Are you sure the name wasn't intended for KWIII? He has a full beard that would be unusual enough in South-East Asia. Yet, many big silver coins would have a portrait: Straits dollars, HK dollar, Spanish pesos, US trade dollar. Only the British trade dollar is portrait-less

Ringgit Tengkorak - this one is easy. Even when only slightly worn, the king looks bald, like a skull.

Ringgit Meriam - neat parallel to the Arabic nickname for this coin: abu midfa (father of the cannon). I could even imagine that the nickname travelled with Persian merchants, sailors and the spreaders of islam.

Ringgit Garuda - probably the pesos of independent Mexico, with an eagle on the reverse. Also evidence that the US trade dollar, which also had an eagle on the reverse, did not take hold in circulation.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline nembiak

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #40 on: February 14, 2016, 12:27:48 PM »
Hi Peter,

You might be correct about the term "Ringgit Kepala" being used for KWIII instead of KWI - it could very well be a relatively modern term used by collectors and not during the actual time period. I don't have Singh's book on hand right now but if I remember correctly, there's a section towards the end of the book about foreign coins that circulated within the peninsular and the local names given to them. You are also correct about Ringgit Garuda being used to refer to the cap and rays peso.

Thanks for the information about the Arabic nickname of the pillar dollars - the history of the "dollar" certainly is something that I'd like to look into. This brings me to another point that has been bugging me for some time, I was wondering if you know anything regarding the origins of the kijang (mousedeer) kupangs of Kelantan? The story goes that an Arab trader gifted Siti Wan Kembang, a Kelantanese princess, with a mouse deer that she took a deep liking to and ordered that her coins depict it.

As most oral traditions should be taken with a pinch of salt, I've tended to lean towards the theory that they are actually a localised depiction of Nandi. Once I'm able to free up some time after my exams, I think it would be quite interesting to work backwards and trace the history of coins depicting Nandi beginning with the Cholas. I've not seen any Chola coins but Rajendra Chola I did invade the northern part of the peninsular and if I remember correctly, they were largely a Saivite dynasty.

Jerry


Online Figleaf

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #41 on: February 14, 2016, 03:29:23 PM »
You are quite right about Saran Singh. I enjoyed the nicknames he gives (ringgit nyonya* for a Victorian HK dollar made me smile, as a fan of nyonya cuisine but Victoria would not have been amused.) SS applies ringgit kepala to both KWI and KWIII coins. However, he is frankly a bit weak on Dutch coins. The 1840 rijksdaalder he shows was struck at a time when the decimal system had not been effectively introduced in the Netherlands East Indies. Today, it is quite an expensive coin (count with €500-1000 for VF). It is not impossible that some ended up in South East Asia, but highly unlikely that there were enough to merit a nickname. A similar thing goes for his picture of an 1898 rijksdaalder: a scarce coin that is quite unlikely to have circulated in East Asia in sufficient quantities to merit its obvious nickname ringgit nona§.

Singh says you are right about the Klantan deer actually being Nandi.

Peter

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Offline nembiak

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #42 on: February 14, 2016, 03:42:10 PM »
That must be one special coin! Just out of curiosity, did the Dutch circulate their own equivalent of the British Trade Dollar/Straits Dollar in their south East Asian colonies?

Online Figleaf

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #43 on: February 14, 2016, 04:10:50 PM »
The official competition for the Spanish peso was the leeuwendaalder (lion dollar, 1575-1713). That's largely before the British and US trade dollars. SS does not include the coin in his list of foreign coins circulating in what is now Malaysia. After the Napoleonic wars, the Dutch economy, based on free trade, was largely destroyed, so there was neither the strength nor the will to compete with the British and Americans.

However, you will find that a number of Netherlands East Indies plantation tokens are denominated in Straits dollars. That's explained here.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.