World of Coins

Research and reference => Numismatics => Topic started by: FosseWay on December 06, 2012, 04:23:26 PM

Title: Currency names in another language
Post by: FosseWay on December 06, 2012, 04:23:26 PM
Completely irrelevant, but I am always a little amused by the denomination 'heller'. In most contexts in Swedish it translates as 'neither'.
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: Figleaf on December 06, 2012, 04:48:12 PM
In modern German it refers to beer. I don't have to tell anyone how a Korean Fun or the Costa Rican Colon come across in English. The Albanian Lek means leaky in Dutch. The Ecuadorean Sucre means sugar in French.

Peter
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: bagerap on December 06, 2012, 04:57:07 PM
The Ecuadorean Sucre means sugar in French
And in Catalan, which probably means Valenciano, Mallorquin, Ibicenco, Canarion and all of the other languages spoken in Spain. Except of course Castellano.
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: Coinsforever on December 06, 2012, 05:03:12 PM
In modern German it refers to beer. I don't have to tell anyone how a Korean Fun or the Costa Rican Colon come across in English. The Albanian Lek means leaky in Dutch. The Ecuadorean Sucre means sugar in French.

Peter
Completely irrelevant, but I am always a little amused by the denomination 'heller'. In most contexts in Swedish it translates as 'neither'.

I got few hellers recently & previously , now your post insisted me to re-think  & correlate  terminology of those coins into other languages   ;) :)


Cheers ;D
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: Afrasi on December 06, 2012, 06:22:06 PM
Long times ago I had a girlfriend named Anna. I was a great joy to see her in her cute Tanga.
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: translateltd on December 06, 2012, 08:09:39 PM
I saw a joke poster once that read "Have you a yen to go to Japan?"

(Yen = desire/interest, in this case.)

Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: <k> on December 06, 2012, 08:24:09 PM
I saw a joke poster once that read "Have you a yen to go to Japan?"

(Yen = desire/interest, in this case.)

From the lyrics of "Wall Street Shuffle", released in 1974 by by 10cc

"You need a yen to make a mark
If you wanna make money"
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: FosseWay on December 07, 2012, 07:57:22 AM
The Albanian Lek means leaky in Dutch.

... and it means 'game' in Swedish (from leka, to play).

Someone mentioned anna -- let's not forget pie, too.
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: Figleaf on December 07, 2012, 10:22:08 AM
Let's not, since the plural means urine in Dutch. An Armenian dram would sound familiar in Scotland. Lari, as in the Georgian currency is nonsense in Dutch. The Kyrgyz som means mathematical exercise in Dutch. The PNG Kina is the name of a medicine against fever. Rand, used in South Africa means edge in Dutch. And how about all those country using pound but not for hammering?

Peter
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: FosseWay on December 07, 2012, 01:26:34 PM
It's strange that many of these names mean something in numerous different languages but the meaning in each is different.

Som can also be Swedish -- meaning 'which', 'that', 'as', 'like'.
Rand means the same in Swedish as in Dutch.
Kina is the Swedish for China (the country), but is pronounced roughly 'Sheena' using English orthography.
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: chrisild on December 07, 2012, 03:52:54 PM
Wait, Heller does not refer to beer in German. 8) Now "(ein) Helles" would refer to some beer indeed, but that requires the -s (neutral gender) ending.

Then again for most people the origin of the word "Heller" (coin from the city of Schwäbisch Hall) is lost. We may think of the (red, or last) Heller as a small amount, a tiny rest of a once big fortune maybe. And "ein Heller" can also mean "a bright one", figuratively or literally.

Christian
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: <k> on December 07, 2012, 06:16:43 PM
Now "(ein) Helles" would refer to some beer indeed, but that requires the -s (neutral gender) ending.

Christian

Just "-s"? It was "-es" in my day.
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: chrisild on December 07, 2012, 06:27:23 PM
Well, "Helle-s" as opposed to the "Helle-r". :)  And the Dutch/Swedish Rand works in German too ...

Christian
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: <k> on December 07, 2012, 06:32:26 PM
Well, "Helle-s" as opposed to the "Helle-r". :)

Christian

But the adjective is "hell". "Das Bier ist hell" but "ein helles Bier".  Move to Prussia and learn your own language.  ;D
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: FosseWay on December 07, 2012, 07:00:32 PM
Random linguistic observation concerning the Germanic languages:

As <k> says, in German one says Das Bier ist hell -- you use the root form of the adjective, regardless of the gender, number or case of the noun it refers to, when the adjective comes after the noun like this.

But in Swedish you apply the normal (indefinite declension) endings, so you get mannen är stark but ölet är starkt and elefanterna är starka ('the man is strong', 'the beer is strong', 'the elephants are strong') depending on the gender and number of the noun.

In most respects Swedish is much less inflected than German - it has only two cases for nouns, one for adjectives; no person- or number-related verb endings (so even fewer than English); two genders to German's three; no subjunctive to speak of; no peculiar word order and so on. But in this respect it seems to have retained more of its antique grammatical heritage.
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: <k> on December 07, 2012, 07:06:05 PM
two genders to German's three

That's because the masculine and feminine genders merged into the common gender, as in Dutch.

German: "der Mann", "die Frau".

Dutch: "de man", "de vrouw".
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: FosseWay on December 07, 2012, 07:21:40 PM
Indeed, though relics of the old masculine and feminine genders survive in Swedish.

You write (and if you're talking proper, you also say) den gamle mannen but gamla with everything else in the definite declension, whether common or neuter, singular or plural. This only applies to male humans (possibly male animals in general? not sure), not objects that once were of the masculine gender.

The Swedish word for 'person', 'human being' is människa (compare Mensch). One always uses the feminine pronouns, hon henne hennes, to refer to en människa because the word was previously feminine, as it is in German. Similarly, klockan is always feminine: Vad är klockan? -- Hon är fem i halv åtta (What's the time? -- It's 25 past seven.)
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: <k> on December 07, 2012, 07:25:26 PM
"Der Mensch" is masculine in German. I don't know in what circumstances "Die Person" (feminine) is used in German, though.
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: FosseWay on December 07, 2012, 07:35:54 PM
Sorry, I'm rather rusty. I could have sworn it was feminine, but looking it up I see it's one of those weak masculines that declines -en in the oblique cases, so perhaps that's what confused me.

Person is probably feminine in German because it was in the language it was borrowed from (whether French or Latin). German tends to retain the original gender for loanwords from languages that have an analogous gender system. Russian, on the other hand, tends not to, preferring to assign loanwords to the relevant gender based on how the word ends.
Title: Re: Currency names in another language
Post by: chrisild on December 07, 2012, 11:23:13 PM
But the adjective is "hell". "Das Bier ist hell" but "ein helles Bier".

Correct. And that is why the noun referring to that beer, derived from that adjective, is "Helles". The "Heller" has nothing to do with a drink, no matter how good or bad it tastes. :)

Quote
Move to Prussia and learn your own language.  ;D

What? Get a time machine and go back more than 50 years, to some time when Prussia existed? Nein danke. I do use Time Machine and have a Time Capsule though, hehe.

Christian (desperately thinking of something that could be on-topic here ... stay tuned)