Author Topic: James Berry's designs for NZ's first decimals that DIDN'T make it.  (Read 5462 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 23 377


James Berry was born in London in 1906 but emigrated to New Zealand in 1925, where he eventually found employment as a freelance artist and designer. By the 1960s, he had already designed several successful stamps and medals. In 1964, New Zealand decided to switch to decimal currency. Designs were invited, and Berry submitted various suggestions featuring Captain Cook and Maori themes, as well as examples of New Zealand’s fauna and flora. Public support for Berry’s designs was overwhelming, and a set comprising his designs was selected in 1966. It was subsequently approved by the Royal Mint, London, and issued in 1967.

Below you can see a photo of Berry in 1952, and his successful designs as they appear on New Zealand's issued decimal coins. Read on to see those of his design ideas that didn't ultimately make it.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2017, 07:35:35 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 23 377
Re: James Berry's designs for NZ's first decimals that DIDN'T make it.
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2011, 01:28:23 AM »
James Berry died in 1979, but he left behind many of his alternative designs for New Zealand’s decimal coins. Some but not all were submitted to the Royal Mint. Some of them are variations on the designs that were accepted; some are entirely different. Individual designs were occasionally tried out on more than one denomination. The scanned images that follow are taken from Reginald Tye’s book, “The Image Maker: The Art of James Berry”.

Below are Berry’s ideas for the one cent coin. His fern frond design (top left) became the official issue.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2017, 08:14:07 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 23 377
Re: James Berry's designs for NZ's first decimals that DIDN'T make it.
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2011, 01:29:04 AM »
Next we see Berry’s choices for the two cents coin. A modified version of his kowhai flowers, seen top left, was eventually chosen.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2017, 08:14:55 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 23 377
Re: James Berry's designs for NZ's first decimals that DIDN'T make it.
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2011, 01:29:36 AM »
Berry’s themes for the five cents coin included a quadrant, a reference to Captain Cook’s voyage, and a five pointed star, symbolising the five-starred Southern Cross. A tuatara design of his ended up on the official coin.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2017, 08:15:16 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 23 377
Re: James Berry's designs for NZ's first decimals that DIDN'T make it.
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2011, 01:29:58 AM »
Below we see Berry’s design suggestions for the ten cents coin. A Maori mask, again by Berry, was the official choice for this denomination.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2017, 08:15:37 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 23 377
Re: James Berry's designs for NZ's first decimals that DIDN'T make it.
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2011, 01:30:32 AM »
Berry’s familiar thematic preoccupations are seen in his sketches for the twenty cents coin. One of Berry’s kiwi designs appeared on the official coin.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2017, 08:16:19 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 23 377
Re: James Berry's designs for NZ's first decimals that DIDN'T make it.
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2011, 01:30:54 AM »
Now we have the fifty cents denomination, which was to become the highest circulating denomination of the set. Berry’s version of Captain Cook’s ship, the Endeavour, seen on other denominations earlier in this topic, graced the eventual circulating coin.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2017, 08:16:42 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 23 377
Re: James Berry's designs for NZ's first decimals that DIDN'T make it.
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2011, 01:31:24 AM »
Berry’s designs for the dollar were not ultimately chosen. That honour went to Englishman William Gardner’s coat of arms design. The dollar was in any case not a circulation coin, being intended as a commemorative coin for collectors.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2017, 08:17:13 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 23 377
« Last Edit: April 16, 2011, 11:06:43 PM by coffeetime »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11 613
  • Mumbai, India.
Re: James Berry's designs for NZ's first decimals that DIDN'T make it.
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2014, 04:38:11 PM »
Today in History - 10 July

On 10 July 1967 New Zealand currency was officially changed from pounds sterling to decimal currency, otherwise known as 'DC Day'.

The switch was the result of many years investigation into the benefits of a decimalised system. Prior to 1967 New Zealanders used the same fractional currency system as Britain, known as pounds sterling.

Many designers submitted designs for the new coinage, and public interest in the potential designs was high, prompted by strong media attention. James Berry, an artist with a background in stamps, medals, and coins, was commissioned to design the entire set of new coins. He was subsequently awarded an OBE for his work on the New Zealand currency and his expertise in the field of numismatic design.

Initially the planned decimal currency was to include a one dollar coin, and Berry created many potential designs for this coin. However the plan for a dollar coin was abandoned and a dollar note was introduced instead. The dollar coin wasn't introduced until 1991, after notes were found to be expensive to produce and required regular replacing due to wear and tear.

These photos are of designs by Berry for the one dollar coin which was never created. Most of them include the words '10 shillings' to aid with the transition between sterling and decimal systems. These designs are part of a series known as the 'Berry Papers', a collection of papers, photographs, negatives, sketches and notes on the design of the new decimal currency.

Reference

Source: Stuff.co.nz
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.