Author Topic: Bengal Sultanate: Ghiyath al-Din Azam Shah Silver Tanka cryptic mint epithet  (Read 569 times)

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Offline shiblius

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Bengal Sultanate: Ghiyath al-Din Azam Shah
Silver Tanka
Mint: Jannatabad (attribution credits nnasir)
Weight: 10.64g
Diameter: 29.07mm

On the obverse at approximately 9 o clock, we have a possible mint epithet "al-mnineh".
Anyone has ideas about what the epithet is / can be?
« Last Edit: December 14, 2017, 05:44:33 PM by Saikat »

Offline Figleaf

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We have some renowned experts on Bengal coins on the site. I suggest you send them a PM.

S. M. Iftekhar Alam
nnasir
Md. Shariful Islam

and others.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Md. Shariful Islam

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Tried this and that. Still could not help. Noman vai and Iftekhar vai may help.

Offline S. M. Iftekhar Alam

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From the type (B226 of GG) and style of scripts it is clearly from Jannatabad mint as was suggested by Noman Nasir earlier though the word "jannatabad" is not clearly visible on this specimen (as most of it has gone out of the flan).

 If I compare and combine the reading of this coin with coin # B/49 then I can read the legends on the con of Shiblius, from 2 O'clock to 7 O'clock, counter clockwise, as "duriba hadhihi al-sikkah al-munirah fi (jannatabad)......"  which stands for " this brilliant (or shiny or bright) coin was struck at jannatabad ......". However, only one "nukta" out of two of the last alphabet of the word munirah is visible. As per rules of Arabic language the last alphabet is supposed to stay separated from the previous letter "ra". But in Bengal hammered coins there are many examples of not following the rules strictly.

Since the word "fi" is sitting between the words "al-munirah" and "jannatabad", so, al-munirah can't be an epithet for jannatabad, rather al-munirah (meaning bright or shiny) is an adjective for the sikkah(i.e. the coin). For example if we look at coin# B/20 of Sikandar, we can read anti-clockwise from 1 O'clock to 5 O'clock : "duriba hadhihi al-sikkah al-mubarakah fi baldah firuzabad)....."  i.e. "this blessed coin was struck in the city of firuzabad ....". Here the word al-mubarakah (the blessed) is an adjective for the coin (sikkah) where as the word baldah (city) after "fi" is an epithet for the mint "firuzabad".

~ Iftekhar



Offline THCoins

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Thank you very much for this detailed analysis ! Very instructive for someone like me still lacking knowledge in this field.

Anthony

Offline Md. Shariful Islam

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Wao! Excellent presentation Iftekhar vai. Very helpful for enhancing capability.

Offline Figleaf

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I want to add my thanks. Many readers will profit from this thread, now and in the future. This is what expertise looks like.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline shiblius

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Awesome description Mr. Alam.
Thanks, for the in-depth analysis, the description makes perfect sense.