Author Topic: Mauryan Empire: A (mini) hoard of 41 Silver Karshapanas  (Read 2506 times)

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Offline mitresh

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Mauryan Empire: A (mini) hoard of 41 Silver Karshapanas
« on: July 21, 2013, 08:45:26 AM »
Mauryan Empire, Circa 300 BC, Punch Mark Coins, Silver Karshapana's

The coin's below comes in various shapes, size and form - circle, oval, square, rectangle, elliptical and uneven.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2013, 10:42:54 AM by mitresh »
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Mauryan Empire: A (mini) hoard of 41 Silver Karshapanas
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2013, 11:23:03 AM »
I wouldn't call it mini. A hoard of 41 coins can yield important statistical information. May I kindly ask you to number the coins, identify the stamps on each* and weigh° them carefully? If you just put this information in a spreadsheet, the data can become available to everyone, simply by sending the spreadsheet.

Peter

* catalogue number is nice to have
° dimensions are nice to have
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline mitresh

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Re: Mauryan Empire: A (mini) hoard of 41 Silver Karshapanas
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2013, 11:29:46 AM »
Numbering and weighing each coin would not be a problem but identifying each symbol on the coin would be tedious.......however, I'll give it a try and see if other's at WoC can pitch in to help once the basic spreadsheet is ready. It will take some time though.....
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Mauryan Empire: A (mini) hoard of 41 Silver Karshapanas
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2013, 11:45:48 AM »
Thank you. I fully realise the work will be tedious, but it will be a small effort to help preserve India's rich history. Maybe nothing will ever come of it, or maybe your small data base will at some time be the key to an important insight. You never know in advance. What I do know, is that you can do a much better job than the authorities.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline cmerc

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Re: Mauryan Empire: A (mini) hoard of 41 Silver Karshapanas
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2013, 02:37:41 AM »
Are all 41 coins part of the same hoard, i.e., part of the same set of coins that were buried/stored together for hundreds of years, till you acquired them?  If so, where was this hoard found?  Or I am wrong in understanding, and these are coins that you have acquired individually as your collection? 

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Offline mitresh

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Re: Mauryan Empire: A (mini) hoard of 41 Silver Karshapanas
« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2013, 07:37:14 AM »
All the 41 coins were acquired by me in a single Lot in the late 90's from a dealer based in Delhi. I did not enquire about the source.
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Offline RG

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Re: Mauryan Empire: A (mini) hoard of 41 Silver Karshapanas
« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2019, 04:56:08 PM »
Added this recently.  Looks different from what I've seen earlier. Seniors please need your expert opinion

Offline EWC

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Re: Mauryan Empire: A (mini) hoard of 41 Silver Karshapanas
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2019, 08:34:28 AM »
The last coin shown is GH 573

see here

(PDF) Late Indian Punchmarked Coins in the Mir Zakah II Hoard | Robert Tye -

The second coin Mitresh put is the same type.  It is probably the last Imperial issue of the Taxila mint, and  since Mitresh’s version is rather worn, his group, if from a hoard, is most likely buried quite a long time after the fall of the Mauryas.

Actually, if we knew the group was “as found”, we might notice there are no 3-man issues in it, (as far as I can see) and wonder if it was (in part?) from the holding of a refugee from the North West, fleeing fighting there?  However, these things seem little liked in Pakistan, so its just as possible they were brought from there to Delhi in modern times, and any 3-man types had been taken out and sold separately.

There is little to be learned from the earlier types in mixed hoards concerning locality – they are almost always very mixed, perhaps due to the way tax collection worked under the Mauryas.

The elephant on flea symbol looks like it might be a bit of political satire, but who knows exactly what?

Rob T