Difference between revisions of "Glasgow Tramway & Omnibus Company"

From World of Tokens
Jump to navigation Jump to search
m
 
Line 1: Line 1:
The "Glasgow Street Tramways Act" was enacted by Parliament in 1869. A separate act was necessary as there existed no "standing orders" for tramways, a recent invention. The British and Foreign Tramway Company Limited, the Corporation of [[Glasgow]], and the Glasgow Tramway and Omnibus Company Limited (GTOCL) partnered for Glasgow's tramway network. The GTOCL was a necessity, because the Glasgow Street Tramway Act did not allow the city to be the operator of the Tramways. It could only own the rails network. The act stipulated that a private company be given the operating lease of the tramways for a period of 22 years. GTOCL issued its prospectus on 21st November, 1871. The first line, from St George's Cross via New City Road, Cambridge Street, Sauchiehall Street, Renfield Street and Jamaica Bridge to Eglinton Toll, was opened for traffic on 19th August, 1872. Mr. [[Menzies, Andrew|Menzies]] was chosen as managing director for five years. GTOCL bought stables in Risk Street and North Street, 500 horses and 50 omnibuses from Mr. Menzies. He resigned in the spring of 1873, though.
The "Glasgow Street Tramways Act" was enacted by Parliament in 1869. A separate act was necessary as there existed no "standing orders" for tramways, a recent invention. The British and Foreign Tramway Company Limited, the Corporation of [[Glasgow]], and the Glasgow Tramway and Omnibus Company Limited (GTOCL) partnered for Glasgow's tramway network. The GTOCL was a necessity, because the Glasgow Street Tramway Act did not allow the city to be the operator of the Tramways. It could only own the rails network. The act stipulated that a private company be given the operating lease of the tramways for a period of 22 years. GTOCL issued its prospectus on 21st November, 1871. The first line, from St George's Cross via New City Road, Cambridge Street, Sauchiehall Street, Renfield Street and Jamaica Bridge to Eglinton Toll, was opened for traffic on 19th August, 1872. Mr. [[Menzies, Andrew|Menzies]] was chosen as managing director for five years. GTOCL bought stables in Risk Street and North Street, 500 horses and 50 omnibuses from Mr. Menzies. He resigned in the spring of 1873, though.


The company issued shilling sheets of perforated car tickets, described as microscopic-green-blotting paper tickets. In January 1889 these were replaced by celluloid 1d tokens. The idea, copied from the USA, was that brass boxes would holding 13 tokens and would be sold for 1 shilling.  The celluloid tokens were welcomed as being a robust replacement of microscopic-green-blotting paper tickets. Like the ticket sheets, the tokens were not sold on the trams or buses and could only be obtained at the company offices.
The company issued shilling sheets of perforated car tickets, described as microscopic-green-blotting paper tickets. In January 1889 these were replaced by celluloid 1d tokens. The idea, copied from the USA, was that brass boxes would hold 13 tokens and would be sold for 1 shilling.  The celluloid tokens were welcomed as being a robust replacement of microscopic-green-blotting paper tickets. Like the ticket sheets, the tokens were not sold on the trams or buses and could only be obtained at the company offices.


In 1894 the lease for the Glasgow tramways expired and Glasgow Corporation did not renew the lease. Following a bitter dispute where Glasgow Corporation refused to buy the GTLOC stock, Glasgow Corporation took over the Glasgow tramways, forming Glasgow Corporation Tramways. Glasgow Corporation then started a process of mechanising the tramways, completing this process in 1902.
In 1894 the lease for the Glasgow tramways expired and Glasgow Corporation did not renew the lease. Following a bitter dispute where Glasgow Corporation refused to buy the GTLOC stock, Glasgow Corporation took over the Glasgow tramways, forming Glasgow Corporation Tramways. Glasgow Corporation then started a process of mechanising the tramways, completing this process in 1902.

Latest revision as of 21:11, 12 September 2022

The "Glasgow Street Tramways Act" was enacted by Parliament in 1869. A separate act was necessary as there existed no "standing orders" for tramways, a recent invention. The British and Foreign Tramway Company Limited, the Corporation of Glasgow, and the Glasgow Tramway and Omnibus Company Limited (GTOCL) partnered for Glasgow's tramway network. The GTOCL was a necessity, because the Glasgow Street Tramway Act did not allow the city to be the operator of the Tramways. It could only own the rails network. The act stipulated that a private company be given the operating lease of the tramways for a period of 22 years. GTOCL issued its prospectus on 21st November, 1871. The first line, from St George's Cross via New City Road, Cambridge Street, Sauchiehall Street, Renfield Street and Jamaica Bridge to Eglinton Toll, was opened for traffic on 19th August, 1872. Mr. Menzies was chosen as managing director for five years. GTOCL bought stables in Risk Street and North Street, 500 horses and 50 omnibuses from Mr. Menzies. He resigned in the spring of 1873, though.

The company issued shilling sheets of perforated car tickets, described as microscopic-green-blotting paper tickets. In January 1889 these were replaced by celluloid 1d tokens. The idea, copied from the USA, was that brass boxes would hold 13 tokens and would be sold for 1 shilling. The celluloid tokens were welcomed as being a robust replacement of microscopic-green-blotting paper tickets. Like the ticket sheets, the tokens were not sold on the trams or buses and could only be obtained at the company offices.

In 1894 the lease for the Glasgow tramways expired and Glasgow Corporation did not renew the lease. Following a bitter dispute where Glasgow Corporation refused to buy the GTLOC stock, Glasgow Corporation took over the Glasgow tramways, forming Glasgow Corporation Tramways. Glasgow Corporation then started a process of mechanising the tramways, completing this process in 1902.

GTLOC took over the Govan and Ibrox Tramway in 1891 and Vale of Clyde Tramway in 1893. In 1896 GTLOC sold the lease of these tramways to Glasgow Corporation and ceased to operate trams. It continued to operate omnibuses across the Scottish midlands. However by 1902 it was in financial difficulty and the shareholders agreed to wind up the company. It was formally wound up in 1908.


Glasgow Tramway & Omnibus Company
GTO.001.jpg
Source (Smith 420/I)
Filename GTO.001
Value
Add Desc. Letter carrier in Uniform
Size (mm) 28x19
Manufacture Copper
Notes
GTO.002.jpg
Source (Smith 420/J)
Filename GTO.002
Value
Add Desc. Telegraph Boy in Uniform
Size (mm) 28x19
Manufacture Copper
Notes Image from the RB Breingan collection auction 17/03/21,

courtesy of Simmons Gallery.

GTO.003.jpg
Source (Breingan)
Filename GTO.003
Value
Add Desc. (cross pattee with lozenges)
Size (mm)
Manufacture Brass
Notes Image from the RB Breingan collection auction 17/03/21,

courtesy of Simmons Gallery.

GTO.004.jpg
Source (Breingan)
Filename GTO.004
Value
Add Desc. Sand Ticket
Size (mm) 25
Manufacture Brass
Notes Image from the RB Breingan collection auction 17/03/21,

courtesy of Simmons Gallery.

File:GTO.005.jpg
Source (Smith)
Filename GTO.005
Value 1d
Add Desc. Tramway Check One Penny Fare - issued from 1889
Size (mm) 23
Manufacture Red Plastic
Notes
File:GTO.006.jpg
Source (Smith)
Filename GTO.006
Value 1d
Add Desc. Tramway Check One Penny Fare - issued from 1889
Size (mm) 23
Manufacture Carmine Plastic
Notes