Circulation coins where one side has neither text nor numerals

Started by <k>, May 30, 2011, 08:47:39 PM

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bart

Iran 250 rial

Bimat

It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

bart

Yemen, Republic

bart

Travancore

bart

Gorizia

bart

Sweden 10 ore.

FosseWay

Kenya 10c, first issue (the other denominations of the first were similar):


Someone mentioned the Belgian 50 centimes upthread; the same applies to the 10 francs of the 1970s/80s:


Slightly stretching the concept of circulation coins, but as you do occasionally see them in use, I thought I'd include it: the 1995 UK £2 commemorating the 50th anniversary of the end of WW2:


bart

The Belgian 10 francs still has some small, not very visible lettering: just beneath the bust of king Bauduin, you can find the designer's name: H. Elstrom.

<k>

nuevas-monedas-malasia-a.jpg

The Malaysian 2012 set will maintain the tradition of having one side text- and numeral-free.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild

Interestingly the central bank calls that "text and numeral free" side the obverse. :) By the way, the 50 sen coin does have digits and characters - somewhat hidden though: The latent image (which the other three denominations do not have) says either "50" or "SEN" depending on the viewing angle ...

Christian

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




President Paul Kruger on the obverse of a Z.A.R. two shillings of 1897.

On some of the Republic's denominations, but not all, there was a legend along with his portrait.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

bart

German Democratic Republic 50 pfennig 1950.

Figleaf

A collage of several elements. In the foreground is a (horse?) drawn plough, in the background front may be a small steel plant, while the far background seems to show oil crackers. The picture makes more sense as the equivalent of the hammer and sickle logo: agriculture and industry.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

The reverses of Singapore's first set of circulation coins, issued in 1967, are all bare of text and numerals.




Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.