Author Topic: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania  (Read 9979 times)

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Galapagos

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Re: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania
« Reply #30 on: October 09, 2009, 12:27:12 AM »
So, Andy, your scans on the 50c pieces in the sticky topic "The Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania" remind me that the Australian 50c started off polygonal but became round.  Yet it appears to have influenced the shape of the Fiji and Tonga 50c pieces. Did either of those become round? I think the recent reduced-size Fiji coin may have.

And now you've added some more scans. So the original Tonga 50c was round. And now we have a heptagonal commemorative one from PNG.

BC Numismatics

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Re: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania
« Reply #31 on: October 09, 2009, 12:33:26 AM »
  It is the other way around.Aussie's silver 50c. coin is the round one.In 1969,it became dodecagonal.Fiji began its 50c. coin issues in 1975 replacing the 50c. note.It is only from 2009 that the Fijian 50c. coin has become a round coin.

Aidan.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2017, 12:36:12 PM by <k> »

BC Numismatics

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Re: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania
« Reply #32 on: October 09, 2009, 01:08:19 AM »
Andy,
  The bimetallic 2 Kina is a circulating commemorative coin like the 50 Toea coins are.Interestingly,the 2 Kina coin circulates along with the 2 Kina note.

The 2 Kina coin is one I also haven't got.

Aidan.

BC Numismatics

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Re: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania
« Reply #33 on: October 09, 2009, 01:10:11 AM »
Andy,
  The Kiribati $2 coin is a circulating commemorative.

I still can't do photos yet.

Aidan.

Galapagos

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Re: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania
« Reply #34 on: October 09, 2009, 01:24:39 AM »
> American Samoa and Northern Marianas Islands also have a Quarter design, but not Palau.

Palau is an independent state, Andy, not a territory of the USA, so it doesn't get a quarter. Though it IS in free association with the USA.

translateltd

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Re: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania
« Reply #35 on: October 13, 2009, 07:47:40 AM »
Here's the answer from the High Commission in Rarotonga about the legal status of the Cook Islands "large" coins:

> [...] confirmed that the old "large" Cook Islands coins from 1 to 50c that were struck between 1972 and 1994 or thereabouts, were demonetised in the Cook Islands when NZ's own pre-2006 large coins were removed from circulation.
>
> [...] understands that there was enabling legislation to allow this process to take place (but was unable to recall the exact name of the relevant Act or regulation).
>
>The Cook Islands currently circulates their own $1, $2 and $5 coins (and use NZ's 10c, 20c and 50c coins). As far as notes are concerned, the Cook Islands circulates their own $3 note (both the green and the pink version) both for normal use and as collector's items. Other notes used are the same ones in circulation in NZ ($5, $10. $20, $50 and $100).



andyg

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Re: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania
« Reply #36 on: October 13, 2009, 08:11:23 PM »
Here are two Tongan Pa'anga's I picked up cheap from ebay last weekend...
Question are these circulating pieces? - this pair do look circulated, I'd always thought they were NCLT.
Maybe they were just badly stored ???
« Last Edit: October 14, 2009, 12:36:12 AM by AJG »

Galapagos

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Re: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania
« Reply #37 on: October 14, 2009, 08:08:40 PM »
Though politically Hawaii is part of the USA and uses the dollar, I should perhaps have included it among the Oceanian polities. As for pseudo-coins issued in its name, see this site:

http://chiefacoins.com/Database/Micro-Nations/Hawaii-Islands.htm

"Each year, the Maui Chamber of Commerce issues a trade dollar. The 39mm copper-nickel token is good for one dollar at participating merchants throughout the island during the year it is issued. Most of the dollars are kept by tourists as souvenirs rather than being redeemed, which raises funds for educational projects on the island."

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania
« Reply #38 on: October 14, 2009, 08:46:22 PM »
Hawaii used dollars even before it was absorbed in the American empire.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania
« Reply #39 on: October 14, 2009, 08:58:53 PM »
Which brings me to this plugged coin. Why would anyone want to plug it?

This may be my earliest bi-metallic coin :)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

andyg

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Re: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania
« Reply #40 on: October 14, 2009, 09:08:35 PM »
Here's the Dollar from the 1883 series.

That's a nice Cent even if it's plugged, quite a rarity.
Anyone considering buying one of these needs to be aware that there are some exceptionally good fakes of this issue.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania
« Reply #41 on: October 14, 2009, 09:27:58 PM »
Here is the complete arms. Note that they still bear the royal crown today. The motto below the arms is also a bit ironic: "The sovereignty of the land is perpetuated in righteousness"

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

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Re: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania
« Reply #42 on: October 19, 2009, 11:35:17 AM »
Andy,
  I think that those 2 1 Pa'anga coins were badly stored.

I do think that they are medal-coins,unlike the rectangular 1 Pa'anga coins,which were circulating coins.

How much did you get them for off FleaBay? If you got them under 5 Quid,then you got yourself a great pick-up.

Aidan.

I believe the large pa'angas circulated (like the large Cook Islands $1) - mainly because low-denomination paper just didn't last long in the tropical climate!


Austrokiwi

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Re: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania
« Reply #43 on: October 21, 2009, 11:38:06 AM »

One day,I will be getting my British Commonwealth Pacific Islands collection scanned & photos uploaded,including my traders' currency tokens from New Zealand,which are actually New Zealand's first coins.

Aidan.

Doesn't this depend on the definitions you use.  If you were to be strict and apply the principle that the coinage had to have some sort of legislative approval then Perhaps NZ s tokens would not count as NZs first official coins.   How ever I am rusty with my knowledge in this area.

Offline <k>

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Re: Comments on the Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania
« Reply #44 on: May 27, 2011, 08:31:38 PM »
I've now updated "The Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania". I've incorporated some of the data from this "comments" topic, and also taken the opportunity to lay out the text and tables more neatly.

I've also taken account of developments such as the 2010 official collector set for the Cooks Islands - which looks like it is a circulation set but doesn't actually circulate.

Click on the link below to see the updated topic:

The Official Currencies and Coinages of Oceania