News:

Sign up for the monthly zoom events by sending a PM with your email address to Hitesh

Main Menu

An Alphabet of Heptagons: Seven-sided Coins

Started by <k>, May 24, 2011, 02:49:58 AM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

<k>

#60
Tonga.jpg

Tonga, 1 pa'anga, 1984.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#61
Uganda, 10 shillings.




Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#62










Uganda, 5 shillings.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#63


United Arab Emirates, 50 fils.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#64
Uk 50p 1973.jpg

United Kingdom, 50 pence.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#65



The other heptagon in circulation in the UK is the 20 pence coin. It has a very wide rim.


Other British-linked territories also use heptagonal 20 pence coins.

However, only the Isle of Man, Gibraltar, and St Helena and Ascension have 20 pence coins with a wide rim.


Jersey, Guernsey, and the Falkland Islands use 20 pence coins with a normal narrow rim.

In the case of the Isle of Man, the issues prior to the year 1993 do NOT have a wide rim.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#66


UK, 50 pence.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#67



In 1997, Western Samoa changed its name to Samoa.

It did this with the agreement of the Americans, who administer American Samoa.

This is reflected on their coinage.

On the later coins, the legend says simply "SAMOA".

On the first coins, it reads "SAMOA I SISIFO", meaning Western Samoa.


Samoa 1T 2002.jpg
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#68
Zambia 1000 kwacha 2000.jpg

No X or Y as yet. For Z, here is a novelty Zambian collector coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#69
Click on the link below to read more about polygonal coins in general:

Polygonal coins have many sides and many facets


To post comments on this topic, please click on the link below:

Comments on "An Alphabet of Heptagons"
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.