Author Topic: Hong Kong: Elizabeth II and the Return to China  (Read 15868 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Hong Kong: Elizabeth II and the Return to China
« Reply #15 on: May 20, 2011, 12:57:49 AM »
Below you see the 10 dollars and the common Bauhinia obverse. The Bauhinia is Hong Kong's emblematic flower.

Also below is a photo of Joseph Yam, designer of the Bauhinia obverse. See: Joseph Yam and the Bauhinia Hong Kong coin design.

The other photo shows the designer of the commemorative set, Lady Elizabeth Haddon-Cave (centre), at a function in 1984. She died in 2008.





 
« Last Edit: March 17, 2016, 03:05:54 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Hong Kong: Elizabeth II and the Return to China
« Reply #16 on: May 20, 2011, 01:00:02 AM »
On 1 July 1997, the transfer of sovereignty from United Kingdom to the PRC occurred, officially ending 156 years of British colonial rule. Hong Kong became China's first special administrative region, and Tung Chee Hwa took office as the first Chief Executive of Hong Kong. That same year, Hong Kong suffered an economic double blow from the Asian financial crisis and the H5N1 avian influenza.

As one of the world's leading international financial centres, Hong Kong has a major capitalist service economy characterised by low taxation and free trade, and the currency, the Hong Kong dollar, which has been pegged to the U.S. dollar since 1983, is the ninth most traded currency in the world. Hong Kong was once described by Milton Friedman as the world’s greatest experiment in laissez-faire capitalism. It maintains a highly developed capitalist economy, ranked the freest in the world by the Index of Economic Freedom for 15 consecutive years. Between 1961 and 1997 Hong Kong's gross domestic product grew 180 times while per-capita GDP increased 87 times over.

Positive non-interventionism was the economic policy of Hong Kong during British rule. It was first officially implemented in 1971 by John James Cowperthwaite, who observed that the economy was doing well in the absence of government intervention but that it was important to create the regulatory and physical infrastructure to facilitate market-based decision making. The policy was continued by subsequent Financial Secretaries, including Sir Philip Haddon-Cave. Economist Milton Friedman cited it as a fairly comprehensive implementation of laissez-faire policy, although Haddon-Cave stated that the description of Hong Kong as a laissez-faire society was "frequent but inadequate".

Offline <k>

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Re: Hong Kong: Elizabeth II and the Return to China
« Reply #17 on: May 21, 2011, 11:16:56 PM »
An interesting point: from the 1950s to the 1970s, the denomination appears in words on all the Hong Kong coins of QEII:





Then, in 1982, the 10 cent coin is reduced in size, and simultaneously the denomination is shown in words AND numerals:





You would imagine that all the other coins would then acquire numerals. In fact, this happens only with the 5 dollar coin from 1980 onwards, when it is reduced in size and changed from a 12-sided coin to a circular one:





All the other denominations continue to be shown in words rather than numerals. We can see that changes were only made to the legends when the size and shape of the coin changed. Presumably this was done to save money. It wasn't until 1993, when the Queen's effigy was replaced by the Bauhinia obverse, that all the denominations were also shown in numerals:



 
« Last Edit: March 21, 2019, 11:25:36 PM by <k> »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Hong Kong: Elizabeth II and the Return to China
« Reply #18 on: May 21, 2011, 11:24:32 PM »
In fact, the coins have numerals, but they are Chinese characters.

Joseph Yam was not a professional graphic designer but a central banker. He did indeed design the Bauhinia, as he wished that the design would remain secret as long as possible.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Hong Kong: Elizabeth II and the Return to China
« Reply #19 on: May 21, 2011, 11:28:28 PM »
In fact, the coins have numerals, but they are Chinese characters.

Yes, I should have stressed that I meant European numerals - which are of course Arabic in origin!

Offline <k>

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Re: Hong Kong: Elizabeth II and the Return to China
« Reply #20 on: May 22, 2011, 05:49:50 PM »
In fact, the coins have numerals, but they are Chinese characters.

Joseph Yam was not a professional graphic designer but a central banker. He did indeed design the Bauhinia, as he wished that the design would remain secret as long as possible.

Peter

Sir Charles Philip Haddon-Cave, (1925-1999) - better known as Philip Haddon-Cave - was Financial Secretary of Hong Kong from 1971 to 1981.
Lady Elizabeth Haddon-Cave was his wife, and she designed many of Hong Kong's commemorative coins, including the reverses of the attractive "Return to China" set of 1997.

Offline Enlil

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Re: Hong Kong: Elizabeth II and the Return to China
« Reply #21 on: July 12, 2011, 02:39:00 AM »
And if you waht to say a $1.80 in cantonese, you say Yat go baat, or Yat maan baat ho. Go and Maan mean dollar and ho means 10 cents. Yat is one and Baat is 8.

Offline <k>

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Re: Hong Kong: Elizabeth II and the Return to China
« Reply #22 on: March 17, 2016, 06:41:47 PM »

Offline <k>

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Re: Hong Kong: Elizabeth II and the Return to China
« Reply #23 on: December 01, 2018, 07:53:52 PM »
Hong Kong, $1000, 1997.  Return to China.