Author Topic: Statue on the Reverse of 500 Rupee note  (Read 24233 times)

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Offline Abhay

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Statue on the Reverse of 500 Rupee note
« on: May 17, 2011, 11:43:34 AM »
Have you ever wondered that from where the Statue which is shown on the reverse of 500 rupee Indian note have been taken?

Those who have seen Delhi, of coarse, must be knowing this very well. But for all others, the statue is known as Dandi March. This statue is located in South Delhi at the intersection of Sardar Patel Marg (SP Marg) and the Mother Teresa Crescent (Willingdon Crescent for old), near Teen Murti Bhawan.

Abhay
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Offline Ukrainii Pyat

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Re: Statue on the Reverse of 500 Rupee note
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2011, 12:37:46 PM »
I think outside of India we know as "Salt March".  I have sometime to buy this note and 100 and 1000 Rupees notes for my Gandhi collection.  I believe no other nation has been so fortunate to have been led by a temporal figure like Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi.
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Offline Ukrainii Pyat

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Re: Statue on the Reverse of 500 Rupee note
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2011, 04:03:35 PM »
I agree, that he was one of many - but in many ways he became the personification of the whole movement.  And that by itself was no easy task in the nation of India - a nation of many nationalities, creeds, beliefs, languages etc.  India as a nation is approaching it's time in the sun - being recognised as a political and economic powerhouse.

Gandhi was no saint, nor did he ever claim or aspire to be so.  If asked, he would have enumerated his many perceived faults.  But his model of political force through passive resistance has been emulated so many times over, from Martin Luther King, to Vaclav Havel and Lech Walesa.  In that he has achieved lasting influence.

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Offline Coinsforever

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Re: Statue on the Reverse of 500 Rupee note
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2011, 12:03:05 AM »
Have you ever wondered that from where the Statue which is shown on the reverse of 500 rupee Indian note have been taken?

Those who have seen Delhi, of coarse, must be knowing this very well. But for all others, the statue is known as Dandi March. This statue is located in South Delhi at the intersection of Sardar Patel Marg (SP Marg) and the Mother Teresa Crescent (Willingdon Crescent for old), near Teen Murti Bhawan.

Abhay

I want to share shameful act of some mischievous thieves or miscreants about this statue.

Please read here

Cheers ;D
Every experience, good or bad, is a priceless collector's item.



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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Statue on the Reverse of 500 Rupee note
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2011, 12:22:46 AM »
I agree with both of you. Gandhi-the-man was a human, a very interesting one but so are most people. Gandhi-the-idea (non-violent resistance) is the part that survives Gandhi-the-man.

I think your argument that there were many is self-evident as soon as you start thinking about it. Gandhi couldn't have done it alone, his idea needs a mass-movement. He provided the leadership. As time goes by, history is simplified and stories center on the leaders. Maybe it is exactly up to historians (and coin collectors are often a sub-species of historians) to keep Gandhi's role in perspective and remember the all-important secondary cast.

How about this statue from Khajuraho? Gandhi being led by innocence in the shape of a young boy.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Ukrainii Pyat

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Re: Statue on the Reverse of 500 Rupee note
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2011, 02:06:44 AM »
One of the funniest stories I remember hearing about was Gandhi's supporters joking about how much it cost them to keep him in poverty.
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Offline Ukrainii Pyat

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Re: Statue on the Reverse of 500 Rupee note
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2011, 01:00:47 PM »

When Gandhi was in London (for the roundtable conference I think), one of the King's staff asked Gandhi whether he thought he was sufficiently dressed to meet the King....Gandhi replied that the King dressed enough for the both of them....I like reading these kinds of things and remembering that an ordinary man did extra-ordinary things

Indeed, he seemed to have a witty response for just about everything.  I also think it was ironic that he went to England in his homespun loincloth - symbolic of self sufficiency - and was welcomed and cheered by the very clothing mill workers that he was trying to put out of work by eliminating India's dependency on British clothing exports.  So it demonstrates that he also was part of a class struggle - something sensed by common English person.
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Offline kansal888

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Re: Statue on the Reverse of 500 Rupee note
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2011, 05:03:13 PM »
Dear Friends

I agree that there were many stellar leaders during our freedom movement. However Gandhiji was totally a class apart. He taught us peaceful and non violent ways. Politicians of today misuse his name without really understanding the great Gandhi.

The sad joke is Gandhi is more powerful today ..as he is printed on every Indian currency note.. A wad of Gandhi can do anything....

Regards

Sanjay Kansal

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Re: Statue on the Reverse of 500 Rupee note
« Reply #8 on: May 19, 2011, 03:06:10 AM »
...... A wad of Gandhi can do anything....

He also had foresight.......... He had asked for the Indian National Congress to be disbanded immediately after independence.

Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"