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Author Topic: Pobjoy Mint Medallions  (Read 1151 times)

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Offline malj1

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Pobjoy Mint Medallions
« on: June 14, 2016, 07:16:25 AM »
POBJOY MINT . MINTERS TO THE WORLD Britannia Rev. POBJOY MINT 300 YEARS OF TRADITION MINT HOUSE OLDFIELDS ROAD SUTTON SURREY   SM1 2NW ENGLAND TEL: 081 641 0370 FAX: 081 644 1028

cu-ni 38.5mm

Malcolm
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Offline malj1

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Re: Pobjoy Mint Medallions
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2016, 07:17:26 AM »
POBJOY MINT . MINTERS TO THE WORLD Britannia Rev. THE QUEENS AWARD FOR EXPORT ACHIEVEMENT 1990

Cu-ni 38.7mm
Malcolm
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Offline malj1

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Re: Pobjoy Mint Medallions
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2016, 07:19:58 AM »
POBJOY MINT . MINTERS TO THE WORLD Britannia Rev. POBJOY MINT 300 YEARS OF TRADITION MINT HOUSE OLDFIELDS ROAD SUTTON SURREY  SM1 2NW ENGLAND TEL: 081 641 0370 FAX: 081 644 1028 

Cu-ni as first one above but a smaller 27.1mm
Malcolm
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Offline redwine

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Re: Pobjoy Mint Medallions
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2016, 07:47:45 AM »
You'd think they'd make more of an effort with Concorde and Britannia.
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Offline malj1

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Re: Pobjoy Mint Medallions
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2016, 08:11:04 AM »
The thing that struck me first was the design encroaching into the outer ring, surely they could have made the design just a little smaller.
Malcolm
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Offline redwine

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Re: Pobjoy Mint Medallions
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2016, 08:33:40 AM »
I hadn't noticed that!  ;D
Her foot and head.  LOL!  ::)
You're advertising your services to the World and celebrating 300 years and ... Oh dear. :-[
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Offline malj1

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Re: Pobjoy Mint Medallions
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2016, 09:17:30 AM »
Even Concorde is heading out of view along with the wheel of her wheelchair.  >:D
Malcolm
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Pobjoy Mint Medallions
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2016, 09:38:33 AM »
What do you reckon started this 300 years of what tradition? Foreigners coming over to England illegally? As in William III? Didn't the Romans do that long before?

BTW, the odd, sloping bow of the ship is typical of the Yamato class battleships, but the superstructure doesn't fit. No huge guns. Reminds me of false teeth in a glass... :P

Peter
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Offline constanius

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Re: Pobjoy Mint Medallions
« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2016, 10:37:37 AM »
What do you reckon started this 300 years of what tradition? Foreigners coming over to England illegally? As in William III? Didn't the Romans do that long before?

Peter

Taya Pobjoy said,
We focus on our family having over 300 years of tradition in medals and craftsmanship in regalia which has been passed on from generation to generation.

Pat

Offline malj1

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Re: Pobjoy Mint Medallions
« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2016, 12:11:59 PM »
In 1977 James A Mackay wrote The Pobjoy Encyclopaedia of Isle Of Man Coins and Tokens the Pobjoy mint issued a medal to commemorate this.

 

Cu-Ni, 38mm.

Here is a scan of part of appendix II

APPENDIX II
THE POBJOY STORY
The story of the Pobjoy family over the past century is a remarkable one of versatility in many different fields - though all of them demanded absolute mastery of the medium and precision in disparate aspects of metalwork.

A century ago William Pobjoy was making a name for himself as a constructional engineer whose lasting monument is the railway through the heart of southern Africa from Capetown to Bulawayo. His younger son, Douglas Rudolph Pobjoy, made the family name a household word in the field of aviation, developing the world-famous Pobjoy radial aero engines, used extensively in the fighter aircraft of the First World War.

The elder son, Edwin Charles Pobjoy, also trained as an engineer. Living in South Africa at the turn of the century, however, he acquired a keen interest in precious metals. Bringing his engineering expertise to bear on gold and silver he returned to Britain and established himself as a manufacturing jeweller and goldsmith. In turn, his three sons carried on the family tradition. The eldest, Reginald, was a Science graduate who turned to horology and made his name as a maker of fine clocks. The youngest, Sidney, became a watchmaker and went into partnership with the Swiss firm of Marchand and Jobin who pioneered the first inexpensive range of chronometers. During the Second World War Sidney served in the RAF Bomber Command and worked on aero engines - following in the traditions of his Uncle Douglas.

The middle brother, Ernest, also served in the RAF and worked on the development of gyroscopic instruments and automatic pilots. Ernest was introduced to the business of jewellery by Reg and became a diamond mounter and manufacturing jeweller. During the war the business was carried on at Streatham, employing a very high proportion of handicapped or men who were otherwise unfit for military service.

After the war the company became the largest repairing and manufacturing jewellers in the English Home Counties. In the immediate postwar years the firm expanded rapidly and diversified into many different fields, often by absorbing small businesses and building them up as specialists in various aspects of metalwork. Among the old-established firms absorbed in this period were the Hawkins Chain Co, of Birmingham (manufacturers of masonic and civic chains), and Ashworth’s of Holloway (military embroiderers). Ernest Pobjoy also went into light engineering and established a factory for chrome and nickel-plating. Eventually the firm became the largest manufacturer of masonic, military, civic and ecclesiastical regalia anywhere in the United Kingdom. In 1959 the group was restructured and Ernest Pobjoy concentrated on the production of regalia at the firm’s London premises in Kingsway, while his eldest son, Derek, managed the jewellery side of the business. Derek Pobjoy, the present Chairman and Managing Director of the group, entered the business as an apprentice straight from school, learning the latest, techniques in engineering, but also training in jewellery under Clementino Dutto, a craftsman then in his eighties who had a lifetime’s experience of fine jewellery and goldsmithing behind him.

It was this unique combination of jewellery and engineering which enabled Derek Pobjoy to develop the production of fine jewellery and bijouterie on a semi-engineering basis. He developed the mechanisation of jewellery while retaining the age-old skills and using to the full craftsmen working in traditional methods. The resulting pieces are truly a blend of craftsmanship and precision.

The manufacture of badges and regalia requires coining equipment, and this led the company into an entirely new medium - the commemorative medal. Commemorative medals were a popular propaganda medium at local and national level since the sixteenth century, but in the nineteenth century they rapidly gave ground to other media: first, the popular press and latterly radio, motion pictures and television. The design and technique of medals had become hackneyed and stereotyped, and it was not until the early 1960s that there was a revival of medals, now considered as an art form in their own right. Derek Pobjoy had a keen interest in commemorative collectables, and he adapted this idea to medallions, in gold and silver, as a tribute to the late Sir Winston Churchill, who died in 1965 in his 91st year. In this manner was launched one of the first medallic issues in Britain since Victorian times, and it was an immediate success. The entire gold issue was sold out within weeks, demonstrating that people were eager to invest in limited editions struck in precious metals, where intrinsic bullion content was allied to a high level of aesthetic and numismatic interest.

The company played a notable part in what became a boom in gold medals - until the British Government pricked the bubble by invoking the Gold Coins Exemption Order, 1966 which effectively brought the manufacture of gold coins and medals to a halt. Nevertheless, numismatic and artistic interest far outweighed such a setback and collectors continued to clamour for finely designed and executed medals as a contemporary record of outstanding events and personalities, even though the use of gold was forbidden.

The rapid expansion of this side of the business necessitated the move into more commodious premises. In i960 the company had moved from Streatham in south London to Sutton in Surrey. Building of Mint House began in 1966 and a year later the firm moved the coining and jewellery divisions into the new building. In the ensuing years the company consolidated and developed its business in minting commemorative medals and ingots which won wide acclaim for their imaginative designs and technical excellence. By the late 1960s the production of commemorative medals had become a fiercely competitive business, with several mints in Europe and America vying with each other in commemorating each major international event. It should be noted that of all the medals produced to celebrate the first moon-landing in 1969, that produced by the Pobjoy Mint was singled out for special mention in the contemporary press and the numismatic literature of that period. While the majority of their competitors fell back on such stock themes as the portraits of the astronauts or pictures of the spacecraft, the Pobjoy Mint featured a close-up shot of Neil Armstrong’s boot descending the ladder from the lunar module - a most unusual treatment which captured the imagination of collectors everywhere.

Other commemorative issues followed; some honouring outstanding world figures such as Albert Schweitzer and John F. Kennedy, others recording great events such as Britain’s entry into the Common Market or celebrating the Royal Silver Wedding. An important commission in 1969 was the striking of the official medals commemorating the Commonwealth Games held in Edinburgh and bearing the profile of H.R.H. the Duke of Edinburgh.

While the company was establishing an international reputation for its fine medallic issues the more mundane aspects of coin-making were not being ignored. Over the past decade the Pobjoy Mint has turned out many millions of tokens, usually struck in base metals, for use in gaming machines, automats and vending machines, as substitutes for actual coins in numerous small commercial transactions, in transportation, entertainment and other service industries. Even this humble aspect of minting has its quasi-commemorative role to play. One of the company’s more important commissions was to strike a series of football medals celebrating the Centenary of the Football Association and which were sponsored by Esso in 1972.

In that year the Pobjoy Mint embarked on the second phase of its expansion: the securing of international contracts for legal tender coinage in gold, silver and base metals. The first contract, with a value in excess of £5 million, came from the Bolivian Government, and was soon followed by similar contracts with the governments of the Isle of Man and Senegal. The Pobjoy Mint subsequently took over the production of Manx coinage from the Royal Mint, and these are distinguished by the Pobjoy mintmark (PM beneath the Queen’s bust on the obverse).

As well as supplying the everyday coinage in base metals, the Pobjoy Mint has supervised the production of limited editions of true collectors’ pieces - proof sets in sterling silver, 22 carat gold and even platinum - as well as handsome crowns in both base and precious metals to commemorate important national and international events. Aesthetically the coins which have so far come from the presses of the Pobjoy Mint have been acclaimed by discerning collectors and numismatic scholars. The spirited figure of the Viking warrior on horseback (on the reverse of the Manx gold coins) has been hailed as a worthy successor to Pistrucci’s St. George and Dragon which has graced the British gold coins since 1816. Technically, however, it is generally agreed that the Pobjoy Mint have raised the art of coin-making to new heights - and given fresh meaning to that overworked numismatic term, Brilliant Uncirculated.

Special techniques have been devised for the striking of coins for collectors. This entailed the redesigning of modern coin presses to meet the very exacting requirements of the Pobjoy Mint. Each coin of Brilliant Uncirculated standard is struck twice, whereas each Proof is actually struck four times, the Pobjoy Mint’s unique minting process ensuring that each strike is made precisely over the preceding one. The new terms BU2 and Proof 4 have had to be coined to denote the superlative qualities of these pieces.

I didn't find the other 200 years ???
« Last Edit: June 15, 2016, 12:25:31 PM by malj1 »
Malcolm
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Offline constanius

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Re: Pobjoy Mint Medallions
« Reply #10 on: June 15, 2016, 02:56:38 PM »
I think that having Britannia's foot resting on the rim and her shield touching it, whilst her head wear causes the rim to curve back away gives the impression that she is still a dynamic force and is too big to be contained by the rim.  In fact she dominates it, not the other way round, whereas if she was made smaller, so as not to encroach on the rim she would herself be dominated "Rule Britannia" It does give a heightened relief impression to the medal, as if she is farther forward than the rim & pushing out.  The edge of her shield/medal is resting on the rim but the angle of it outward, which shows the edge, enhances the effect.



This is a painting with a much more dramatic example!



 I think the Concorde's effect on the rim does not work.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 08:38:16 PM by constanius »

Pat

Offline redwine

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Re: Pobjoy Mint Medallions
« Reply #11 on: June 15, 2016, 06:28:49 PM »
Have to disagree with Pat! :P
That effort at Britannia is an affront to those Brits that care for these things.  Her pushing the rim out says it all.
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Offline constanius

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Re: Pobjoy Mint Medallions
« Reply #12 on: June 15, 2016, 07:05:13 PM »
I still like the pose.

I confess the actual image of Britannia herself is not very flattering but you must admire the fact that the now venerable lady has resisted the modern trend of cosmetic surgery including a breast lift ;D

Next you will want her twerking & taking selfies :o :D

Pat

Offline redwine

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Re: Pobjoy Mint Medallions
« Reply #13 on: June 15, 2016, 07:38:40 PM »
The face, what's that about!  She had a refined quality now she looks like a, I wont go there. 
I'm not into twerking and selfies.
As for cosmetic surgery, the bigger the better!  ;D
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Offline malj1

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Re: Pobjoy Mint Medallions
« Reply #14 on: September 13, 2016, 12:31:54 PM »
POBJOY MINT . MINTERS TO THE WORLD Britannia Rev. THE QUEENS AWARD FOR EXPORT ACHIEVEMENT 1990

Cu-ni 38.7mm

A bimetal for the same occasion THE QUEENS AWARD FOR EXPORT ACHIEVEMENT 1990 with POBJOY MINT Sutton Surrey obverse. 25.9mm
Malcolm
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