Author Topic: Qing mintmarks  (Read 7372 times)

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Online Figleaf

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Qing mintmarks
« on: April 29, 2011, 07:42:10 PM »
Here is a table from Chinesische Käschmünzen by A. A. Remmelts (as amended, see below) with mintmarks in Manchu on the reverse of Chinese cash coins as used in the period 1723-1912:

keyWade-GilesPinyin
APublic finance authority (Peking)Beijing
BPublic works authority (Peking)Beijing
Cche (Chekiang)Zhejiang
Dyun (Yunnan)Yunnan
Esu (Kiangsu)Jiangsu
Fan (Anhui)Anhui
Gchien (Tientsin)Tianjin
Hshen (Shensi)Shaanxi
Ifu (Fukien)Fujian
Jchang (Nanchang in Kiangsi)Jiangxi
Kkuei (Kueilin in Kuangsi)Guangxi
Lkuang (Kuangtung)Guangdong
Msame as D
Nnan (Hunan)Hunan
Ochuan (Szechuan)Sichuan
Pchin (Shansi)Shanxi
Qchi (Shinan Fu in Shantung)Shandong
Rtai (Taiwan Fu on Taiwan)Taiwan
Schih (Chihli)Zhili
Ttung (Tong Chuan in Yunnan)Yunnan
Uchien (Tientsin)Tianjin
Vwu (Wuchang in Hupei)Hubei
WYarkand (Turkestan)
X1 cash Aksu (Turkestan)
YYerkim (Turkestan)
ZUshi (Turkestan)
AA5 cash Aksu (Turkestan)
BB10 cash Aksu (Turkestan)
CCtung (Tong Chuan in Yunnan)Yunnan
« Last Edit: July 14, 2016, 02:32:22 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Arminius

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Re: Qing mintmarks
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2011, 09:14:44 AM »
Thanks for this comprehensive overview and the shortcuts to detailled infos!

 :) :)

Offline Chinasmith

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Re: Qing mintmarks
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2013, 10:32:41 AM »
Hello --  The Qing Dynasty mintmark chart is nice, but T and CC are different forms of the same mintmark, and both attributions are wrong. This is really the mark of the Tong Chuan mint in Yunnan province. I believe it began using the mark in the Jia Qing reign. In the Guang Xu period, around 1900, the Tong Chuan mint had closed and a new mint at Chefoo in Shantung used this mark briefly. Check the Standard Catalog of World Coins by Krause -- 19th century volume. --  BWS
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Qing mintmarks
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2013, 03:44:58 PM »
Done. Please note that I have no particular knowledge in this field. The table is from Remmelts.

Peter
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Offline Chinasmith

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Re: Qing mintmarks
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2013, 04:17:36 AM »
Mintmark U  in this table is not Ning; it is "Chien" (Jian) for the Tientsin Mint. Despite the listing in Schjoth, there was never a mint at Ningpo.
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Qing mintmarks
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2013, 09:16:59 AM »
Are you saying G and U are the same (chien), but for different mints? They look slightly different to me, as U seems to have an extra stroke at right...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Chinasmith

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Re: Qing mintmarks
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2013, 03:55:56 AM »
Sorry -- I didn't notice. Yes, G and U are the same mark (the first written incorrectly) for the same mint.
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