Author Topic: South African token, Capetown Tramways  (Read 2937 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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South African token, Capetown Tramways
« on: August 04, 2008, 07:13:31 PM »
Plastic-like token, 1.6 gr., 25.4 mm.

Presumably originally a penny token for three Capetown oriented tramway companies, devalued to 1/2 penny by a counterstamp. Why the devaluation? Was there a time went prices went sharply down, or were new ticket prices increased by halfpence and nobody had foreseen a halfpenny token?

The ad on the reverse says: (around) TOWER OR SPRINGBOK PARAFFIN (in circle) BEST FOR USE IN LAMPS OR STOVES. Oil lamps? Or was the ad aimed at sturdy bushmen, about to camp in the field but getting a bath and a shave in Capetown first?

Peter
« Last Edit: August 04, 2008, 07:15:42 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline muenz-goofy

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Re: South African token, Capetown Tramways
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2008, 07:49:30 PM »
Peter,

I will qoute some words of the book of Dr. Theron "Tokens of Southern Africa and their History", issued in August 1978. The tokens of the City Tramways of Cape Town were "in use during the years 1919 and 1920. Also in a letter from ... dated 21st April 1950, he wrote that these tokens werd 'last used more than 30 years ago'. The celluliod tonkens show manny different types over 36 in all. ... These advertisements so displayed, helped to offset the manufacturing costs of the tokens."

This was the statement ot Dr. Theron. Your special token is listed in the catalogue of K.& K. Smith (Catalogue of World Horsecar, Horseomnibus, Streetcar and Bus Tokens (1990)) as No#160BD.

Please take a look of another token of my collection (Smith#160AH). There are other tokens of CPT tramway made of Nickel and Aluminium. I have an Alu token in my collection, but the grade is bad and not really presentable. If you like, I will post it.

For the time being
Dietmar
« Last Edit: August 04, 2008, 07:51:45 PM by muenz-goofy »
God created the ocean, we the boat. God created the wind, we the sail. He created the lull, we the paddle (African proverb)

Offline Figleaf

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Re: South African token, Capetown Tramways
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2008, 07:58:56 PM »
Very welcome information, muenz-goofy and a fun picture. Your copy has two ads and the value is stil counterstamped, making the ads hard to read - on mine, the counterstamp degraded the ad. Celluloid. Right. Another question answered, but I still think the ad for lamp oil is odd. Surely, there must have been electricity in Capetown from 1919...

Please do post away. Every picture makes the forum better and more fun.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline muenz-goofy

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Re: South African token, Capetown Tramways
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2008, 08:42:43 PM »
Surely, there must have been electricity in Capetown from 1919...

... but not in the townships around the city, where the majority of people were living. You are prepared to see my poor aluminium token of Cape Town tramways. Here it is....

Cheers
Dietmar
God created the ocean, we the boat. God created the wind, we the sail. He created the lull, we the paddle (African proverb)

Offline Figleaf

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Re: South African token, Capetown Tramways
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2008, 09:00:34 PM »
I expected something far worse. Aluminium is vulnerable.

I am wondering if the thing down below is this (Tafelberg from the Capetown side)



An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline africancoins

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Re: South African token, Capetown Tramways
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2008, 10:48:41 PM »
Yes the design on the Aluminium piece includes Table Mountain (assumably that it is know as Tafelberg in Afrikaans).

Thanks Mr Paul Baker