Author Topic: Hand engraving  (Read 4011 times)

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Offline kansal888

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Hand engraving
« on: April 02, 2011, 03:23:29 PM »
the best dies with the most details are handmade even today and not in india but even in the usa and europe.  the engravers are paid a huge amount of money

As far as I am aware, modern day engravers make a large scale model of the coin in plaster of paris. Automatic machines scale down the large model to a small die. This is called "die engraving pantograph".

I also believe that modern technology allows you to make a 3D design of a coin on computer. The CNC machines can easily transfer this design to die. The engraver can make a coin without actually touching the cutting tool.

Thus, modern day engravers are more of designers and less of actual engravers.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2011, 03:42:27 PM by kansal888 »

Offline The Oracle

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Hand engraving
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2011, 09:17:19 PM »
As far as I am aware, modern day engravers make a large scale model of the coin in plaster of paris. Automatic machines scale down the large model to a small die. This is called "die engraving pantograph".

I also believe that modern technology allows you to make a 3D design of a coin on computer. The CNC machines can easily transfer this design to die. The engraver can make a coin without actually touching the cutting tool.

Thus, modern day engravers are more of designers and less of actual engravers.

depends on what your definition of modern is and what mint you are talking about.   yes you can design coins on a computer or use plaste rof paris but not all mints follow that procedure but the engravers i am speaking of would rather die then use anything but their hands and while they might not bag coty they certainly are a respected lot. 

Online Figleaf

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Hand engraving
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2011, 01:19:00 PM »
While I don't know of any contemporary hand engravers for coins, practically all art medals are engraved by hand and I know of one British hand engraver who helps produce banknote designs, in combination with computer-produced designs. Saw an article about him recently. I'll try to dig it up and post it here.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline kansal888

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Hand engraving
« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2011, 01:29:30 PM »
Peter as far as I am aware, most coin engravers work on a large palster of paris or wax designs. The large design is then scaled down to a die using CNC machines. Can you please enlighten us...

Online Figleaf

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Hand engraving
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2011, 01:37:00 PM »
We agree. All coin designers work on plaster or synthetic wax-like substances. The exception are outside the coin design world.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline repindia

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Hand engraving
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2011, 09:30:59 PM »
depends on what your definition of modern is and what mint you are talking about.   yes you can design coins on a computer or use plaste rof paris but not all mints follow that procedure but the engravers i am speaking of would rather die then use anything but their hands and while they might not bag coty they certainly are a respected lot. 
While I don't know of any contemporary hand engravers for coins, practically all art medals are engraved by hand and I know of one British hand engraver who helps produce banknote designs, in combination with computer-produced designs. Saw an article about him recently. I'll try to dig it up and post it here.

Peter

I think both of you are correct. I watched a video and some articles of the Royal Mint Canada which give the die making process and they showed the engravers using a combination of real life pictures and hand engraving. In any case the final finishing is done by hand.

Please check this out-->
http://www.mint.ca/store/artist/tony-bianco-7400020?cat=Meet+The+Artist&nId=4600002&parentnId=&nodeGroup=Learn

A couple of quotes from here-->

"My process and use of technology has grown along with the Mint. In 2000 I did all the designs by hand in graphite. Now I still do every element by hand, but I scan them in and move them around until the final design is born."

"I complete the final design completely by hand. I think of making a 3D sculpture you know so, the engraver can envision high relief here or a shiny or frosted area there."

Online Figleaf

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Hand engraving
« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2011, 02:00:21 AM »
Hand engraving is not about using your hands to engrave, but about building a picture by cutting directly into the metal, without mechanical or electronic help. This is a process that was once used everywhere and now used nowhere. Electronics and reducing machines are so powerful and precise, that hand engraving has become uncompetitive and taking too much time for design. The artist you quote works in graphite, not metal to sculpt a design, rather than cut it, as a hand engraver would do.

The last hand engraver of coins I know of was Raymond Joly. In this thread, you can see him at work on a die. The last banknote hand engraver I know is still alive: Tony Maidment.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 04, 2011, 10:37:03 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.