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First euro?

Started by Figleaf, March 19, 2011, 08:57:15 PM

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Figleaf

Next Wednesday, the auction house Christie's actions off a euro from 1971. In that year, Time magazine launched a challenge for advertising houses to make the most original advertisement. Dutch advertising agency Prad won the prize with an ad for a prize for the best name for the common European currency.

There were 1077 entries, proposing names like Alpha, Churchill, Ecu, Luns, Pompidou, Spes and Valor, but the winner was euro. The advertising agency had a design made by Dutch sculptor Eric Claus and had 500 pieces minted.

The legend on the 25 mm coin is EUROPA FILIORUM NOSTRORUM DOMUS or Europe, house of our children. The coin, in the original packing of the Prad advertising agency, is auctioned in one lot with an 18 cm bronze plaque with the same design. The auction house estimates that the lot will bring in 500 to 700 real euros.

Information from this page

The lot can be inspected here.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

#1
I like the lettering (below the 1 in particular) - a lot more "arty" than the real thing in use now.  Possibly too much like an art medal, but "oi'll give it foive".


chrisild

That piece is depicted in Gerhard Schön's euro coin catalog. Don't have the book at hand (I'm in North Carolina) but maybe somebody else can look it up. If not, I can do that later this month ...

Christian

nomadbird

Quote from: coffeetime on March 19, 2011, 09:09:05 PM
The design is certainly unusual, in that the year and denomination are split by the large figure "1" and are horizontal, whereas more usually you'd find them along the curve of the circle, away from the centre. I'm not sure I like it, but it deserves marks (no pun intended) for originality.

Anything can be defined unusual, if we literally did not have/felt  the experience. Designer to Designer may create that way. Usually what you find are not from 1971 right?
Thx
Nomadbird

a3v1

Quote from: chrisild on March 19, 2011, 10:19:28 PM
That piece is depicted in Gerhard Schön's euro coin catalog. Don't have the book at hand (I'm in North Carolina) but maybe somebody else can look it up. If not, I can do that later this month ...
It no longer is shown in recent editions of Gerhard Schön's euro coin catalog; it appeared in early editions only. Gerhard Schön didn't give any details except that it was minted in the Netherlands.
Regards,
a3v1
Over half a century of experience as a coin collector.
-------------
Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

Figleaf

While the piece may be the first to use the word euro, it is necessarily not a coin but a fantasy, since the piece has no official status, the idea of a common currency was accepted later and the actual coins came even later, of course. I do not understand why a fantasy should command such a high price, unless it is artfully hyped.

I agree that it is clear from the design that there is a sculptor, rather than a medallist at work here, though the sculptor did try his best to think of the requirements of a coin: the denomination is prominent and legible, the design flat. The lettering below the 1 will quickly become unreadable at a distance and the design on the other side becomes recognizable only if you already know what it looks like. Personally, I thing splitting the date and denomination is innovative. It works, because the result is well balanced and the intention clear. I can't remember having seen it before (which alone makes it unusual), but that is not a value judgement.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

Now that I'm back, I had a look at my catalogs. And actually the image is still there, even in the latest edition of Gerhard Schön's euro book (10th ed. 2011, p. 10). Earlier versions mentioned that the first medal with a 1 euro "denomination" was issued in 1965; they would also show the 1971 piece and say it was made in the Netherlands. The current edition still has the same picture, but (as far as I can tell) does not actually explain what the piece is ...

Christian