login

Author Topic: UK 1981 Trial 20p  (Read 6690 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15 983
UK 1981 Trial 20p
« on: March 13, 2011, 10:58:30 PM »
Here's a piece that a fellow member alerted me to a few years ago. I had never heard of it before, and I still don't know anything about it, except that it looks to be a genuine trial piece. The obverse and reverse designs are very attractive too. The actual UK 20p coin was released in 1982.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2017, 08:38:26 PM by <k> »

Offline UK Decimal +

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 475
  • Nil carborundum
Re: UK 1981 Trial 20p
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2011, 12:27:12 AM »

It is interesting that the broad border wasn't used in Britain, but it is used in Gibraltar.

A couple of coins from my pocket (yes, Gibraltar coins do circulate in England - many thanks to my favourite barmaid who noticed a coin that looked different).

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15 983
Re: UK 1981 Trial 20p
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2011, 12:30:47 AM »
It is interesting that the broad border wasn't used in Britain, but it is used in Gibraltar.

I'd never noticed that. Some territories don't used the countersunk planchet at all - IOM being one of them. I know St Helena & Ascension DOES use it - off hand I couldn't say with regard to Jersey, Guernsey, Falkland Isles.


Offline UK Decimal +

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 475
  • Nil carborundum
Re: UK 1981 Trial 20p
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2011, 12:34:24 AM »

Re. the IoM, perhaps it has something to do with the company that produces their coins.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Offline tickymicky

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • A post a day keeps the shrink away
Re: UK 1981 Trial 20p
« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2012, 03:10:54 PM »
I have one of these trial 20p pieces(tended in with a bus fare).I contacted The Royal Mint (Chris Barker), and AMR coins. I got a better reply from AMR coins who stated that one of these sold at auction in 2007 for 440.00 + commission making a total of around 560.00. They advised me to insure it for 700.00-900.00.Needless to say, I have listed it on ebay for a starting price of 500.00. I have also included the emails that I received regarding the coin. If you want to view it, my username is mh140_5
« Last Edit: October 11, 2014, 05:41:39 PM by eurocoin »

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15 983
Re: UK 1981 Trial 20p
« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2012, 03:14:35 PM »
Very nice. You're in a good place to harvest such rarities.  ;)

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15 983
Re: UK 1981 Trial 20p
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2014, 11:56:49 AM »
I have just found some more information on an auction site. It lists the trial as being for a 25 pence coin. Given the late date, 1981, this seems implausible, since the actual 20 pence coin was first issued in 1982. Back in 1981, the coins in circulation were p, 1p, 2p, 5p, 10p and 50p.

In pre-decimal times, the highest coin was a half crown (two shillings and sixpence), which was equivalent to 12p and did not translate into a neat decimal denomination. The crown was reserved for collector issues only, and the ten shilling note was replaced by the 50 pence coin. So there was a large gap between the 10p and the 50p, which need to be filled.

Most coinage systems that include a two unit, such a Britain with its 2 pence coin, also have a 20 unit. The USA, by contrast, uses a quarter (25 cents) and not a 20c coin, because it has no 2 cents coin these days. Therefore it follows that in considering a new coin to fill the gap between the 10p and the 50p, Britain would have opted for a 20p coin and not a 25p. My conclusion is that the auction house's description of this trial as being for a 25p coin is wrong.

The description from the auction house:

Trial 25 Pence, 1981, in cupro-nickel, crowned arms flanked by Tower and rose, experimental coin and date, rev. orb, royal mint trial, 5.73g/12h (cf. DNW 107, 618). As struck, extremely rare 600-800.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 25 632
Re: UK 1981 Trial 20p
« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2014, 07:11:30 PM »
Not too fast. The problem was the gap between the 10p (former florin) and the 50p (former 10 shilling note). The logical denomination in pre-decimal times to fill that gap would have been the crown. Its equivalent is a 25p piece. You are of course right that it didn't circulate, but it was minted. I agree that once you let go of pre-decimal thought, 20p is the more logical denomination. I doubt that the double florin played a role in that decision ;)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.