Author Topic: The Designing of the Sceilig Mhichil 10 Euro Coin  (Read 3663 times)

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Offline <k>

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The Designing of the Sceilig Mhichil 10 Euro Coin
« on: February 04, 2011, 06:11:28 PM »
Thanks to Michael Guilfoyle, I am able to show you some of his ideas for this design.

Mr Guilfoyle is seen on the far right in the photo below.


« Last Edit: July 14, 2017, 07:44:50 PM by <k> »
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: The Designing of the Sceilig Mhichil 10 Euro Coin
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2011, 11:00:43 PM »
Once again excellent research! I liked the idea of morphing birds into stars, but the end result is quite strong already. The use of Gaelic is a plus for me. Glad the little man on top of the mountain didn't make it, but too bad the cross did not fit in. Altogether a great document, that really adds value to the design. Thanks.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: The Designing of the Sceilig Mhichil 10 Euro Coin
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2011, 12:40:24 PM »
Would have been neat if the "beehive" cells of the monks had become part of the design. Ah well, maybe the result would have been too busy. Interesting that some of the sketches say "Unesco" (referring to the World Heritage status) which was then dropped as well.

As you can see, the piece was part of the Euro/Star series. Minted in Utrecht by the way.

Christian

Offline Figleaf

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Re: The Designing of the Sceilig Mhichil 10 Euro Coin
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2011, 03:16:44 PM »
Sure, there are enough ideas here for two or three good designs, but there's only one coin. Apparently, the designer wanted to stress the spiritual value of the islands (many designs show part of two islands). That's not easy, but I think the rock/bird/stars combination does the job very well, conveying a message that is understandable for non-Christians also.

The beehives and cross are strong symbols, not of the spirituality, but of the hermits, the people. If there would have been a second design, I think the presentation on the lower left of the cross and beehive would have been the perfect counterpart, showing a completely different approach of the subject.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: The Designing of the Sceilig Mhichil 10 Euro Coin
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2011, 05:32:28 PM »
A correspondent has told me that this is the first time he has seen illustrations of alternative designs for an issued silver coin from the Eurozone. He thinks this may be a first on the internet. I'm not an expert, so I can't say.

To clarify, has anybody seen any illustrations of preliminary designs, whether sketches or computer-aided designs, that were both:

1] Intended for coins from the Eurozone?

2] Intended for silver, or commemorative, or non-circulation euro coins?


We have seen alternative designs for circulation euro coins before, of course. Christian shows some here:

Coin designs that did not make it

« Last Edit: February 05, 2011, 05:41:56 PM by coffeetime »
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Offline chrisild

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Re: The Designing of the Sceilig Mhichil 10 Euro Coin
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2011, 05:45:50 PM »
A correspondent has told me that this is the first time he has seen illustrations of alternative designs for an issued silver coin from the Eurozone.

As Peter mentioned, whenever a new German commemorative coin (€2 bimetallic) or silver/gold collector coin is issued, the BBR (Federal Office for Building and Regional Planning) publishes the designs of the (usually four) finalists. And there are quite a few topics here that deal with these competitions.

Finland also makes the submitted designs, winners and non-winners, of collector coins public. Not sure about the other euro countries, but "the first time" ... nah.

Christian

Offline chrisild

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Re: The Designing of the Sceilig Mhichil 10 Euro Coin
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2011, 12:06:10 AM »
Just came across this interview with Michael Guilfoyle, published by Coin News (July 2010):

http://www.guilfoyledesign.com/article.pdf

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: The Designing of the Sceilig Mhichil 10 Euro Coin
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2011, 12:26:33 AM »
It was a result of that interview that I emailed him. It turned out that because he is a freelancer, he doesn't alway know which of his designs get accepted and minted. It was news to him, for instance, that his designs for Mozambique were circulating on their national coins.
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: The Designing of the Sceilig Mhichil 10 Euro Coin
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2011, 09:44:36 AM »
Slightly OT, but if you ever find yourself with the chance to go to Skellig Michael, take it -- it's an amazing place.

Offline <k>

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Re: The Designing of the Sceilig Mhichil 10 Euro Coin
« Reply #9 on: February 16, 2011, 03:42:41 PM »
Slightly OT, but if you ever find yourself with the chance to go to Skellig Michael, take it -- it's an amazing place.

Not OT! When I went to Jersey, I made sure to see all the sights depicted on the coins, which was well worth it and made me appreciate the designs even more. I do enjoy small islands, such as the Farne Islands, and little Herm, a dependency of Guernsey.
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