Author Topic: Trees on coins  (Read 24907 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Trees on coins
« Reply #30 on: August 25, 2011, 11:09:31 PM »
Zanzibar, 10 cents, 1908.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2018, 01:24:55 AM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Trees on coins
« Reply #31 on: August 27, 2011, 05:03:59 PM »
Liberia.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Trees on coins
« Reply #32 on: August 29, 2011, 12:29:52 AM »
British West Africa, 1 shilling, 1913.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2017, 03:02:54 PM by <k> »
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Offline Bimat

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Trees on coins
« Reply #33 on: October 15, 2011, 10:16:49 AM »
New $2 coin from Antigua:

The reverse side displays the 2011 Financial Information Month logo, which depicts a tree growing from the palm of two hands with coins and the theme: “Grow Your Savings.”



Aditya
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Offline <k>

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Re: Trees on coins
« Reply #34 on: April 18, 2012, 10:01:33 PM »
Solomon Islands, 1995, $1.   F.A.O. commemorative.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2019, 11:57:38 PM by <k> »
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Trees on coins
« Reply #35 on: April 19, 2012, 12:29:36 AM »
Leaves on the obverse, roots on the reverse, this Dutch coin is claimed to show the shortest tree in the world.

Peter
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Offline malj1

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Re: Trees on coins
« Reply #36 on: April 19, 2012, 03:36:10 AM »
I had never seen this beautiful Prince Edward Island cent until today. Who knows which species of trees are depicted on it?

In 1769 St. John's Island, became a separate colony and received a great seal bearing a representation of a large oak spreading over three saplings. Underneath, the inscription, parva sub ingenti, (the small under the protection of the great) referring to the island being under the protection of the Great Britain. The three saplings are now regarded as representing the three counties of Kings, Queens, and Prince, and the oak, Prince Edward Island, as it was renamed in 1799.

Source

« Last Edit: April 19, 2012, 08:41:47 AM by coffeetime »
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Offline malj1

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Re: Trees on coins
« Reply #37 on: April 19, 2012, 05:58:45 AM »
The Australian two dollar coin shows the Xanthorrhoea, commonly known as the grass tree and found throughout Australia.


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Malcolm
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Offline <k>

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Re: Trees on coins
« Reply #38 on: July 18, 2012, 11:09:08 AM »
Namibia: 5 cents - aloe (Aloe littoralis);  10 cents - camelthorn tree (Acacia eriolaba).
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Offline <k>

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Re: Trees on coins
« Reply #39 on: July 18, 2012, 11:09:52 AM »
Namibia, 50 cents: quiver tree (Aloe dichotoma).
« Last Edit: March 22, 2019, 11:59:21 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Trees on coins
« Reply #40 on: August 02, 2012, 10:15:42 PM »
Costa Rica, 10 colones, 1975. 

Enterolobium cyclocarpum, commonly known as the guanacaste or the elephant ear tree, is a species of flowering tree in the pea family, Fabaceae. The abundance of this tree, especially in Guanacaste Province, Costa Rica where it is prized for the shady relief that it provides from the intense sun, coupled with its immensity, have made it a widely recognized species. It is the national tree of Costa Rica.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2020, 04:48:23 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Trees on coins
« Reply #41 on: August 03, 2012, 12:52:56 AM »
Tonga, 1 pa'anga, 1975.    100 date palm trees. Why? Because 1 pa'anga is equal to 100 seniti.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Trees on coins
« Reply #42 on: September 24, 2012, 11:35:52 PM »
South Africa, silver collector 50 cents, 2012.   Baobab tree, Peace Park.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Trees on coins
« Reply #43 on: September 24, 2012, 11:37:03 PM »
South Africa, silver collector 5 cents, 2012.   Baobab tree plus seed pods.
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Offline squarecoinman

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Re: Trees on coins
« Reply #44 on: September 25, 2012, 09:13:55 PM »
Iraq Palm tree
« Last Edit: April 16, 2014, 03:50:58 PM by <k> »
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