Author Topic: Windmills on Coins  (Read 10462 times)

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Offline <k>

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Windmills on Coins
« on: February 16, 2011, 11:16:05 PM »
This topic is in honour of Peter, aka Figleaf, whose generosity gives us the World of Coins forum. As possibly the world's proudest Dutchman, he considers the windmill to be the greatest creation of the Netherlands, and he becomes depressed if he doesn't see at least two a week. Well, here is his weekly quota, from Barbados and the Turks and Caicos Islands. The T&C coin is equal (denomination-wise) to a US half dollar and was meant to circulate, and I am told they are still found in change on rare occasions.





Barbados, 25 cents.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2019, 02:25:28 PM by <k> »
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Windmills on Coins
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2011, 11:33:13 PM »
This one is a circulating €2 commem from Spain:



The coin commemorates the 400th anniversary of the book "Don Quixote" by Cervantes.

Christian

Offline chrisild

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Re: Windmills on Coins
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2011, 11:39:22 PM »
No windmills on Dutch coins as far as I know. ;) But at least there is this ...



A mint set from 1995. As the theme is South Holland, that should be Kinderdijk.

Christian

Offline izotz

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Re: Windmills on Coins
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2011, 11:58:12 PM »
This one is a circulating €2 commem from Spain:
(...)
The coin commemorates the 400th anniversary of the book "Don Quixote" by Cervantes.

Christian
Christian is much faster than me :D

There are many coins in Spain about "Don Quixote". Some show a windmill. Another one :

This stands for the region of Castilla - la Mancha, where the story of "Don Quixote" (actually Don Quijote de la Mancha) takes place.

Offline <k>

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Re: Windmills on Coins
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2011, 12:04:05 AM »
Guernsey coin, windmill on the island of Sark, a dependency of Guernsey.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2019, 01:14:51 AM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Windmills on Coins
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2011, 12:23:28 AM »
Australia.
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Windmills on Coins
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2011, 12:34:48 AM »
I am honoured! And I think the windmill was what gave the inventor of the helicopter inspiration. :D

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Windmills on Coins
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2011, 12:39:26 AM »
Indeed, no windmills, wooden shoes, people in funny clothes or marihuana plants on Dutch coins and the one Dutch coin with a tulip was issued during the second world war. Such objects may loom just a little bit smaller in the Dutch psyche. ;D

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Abhay

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Re: Windmills on Coins
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2011, 01:21:52 AM »
One of the photographs showing Windmill on wooden shoes, from my trip to Holland way back in 2002. :)

Abhay
INVESTING IN YESTERDAY

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Windmills on Coins
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2011, 01:49:07 PM »
I hope you enjoyed yourself, Abhay.

The ministry I worked for hated the agrarian tourist symbols, as part of its task was flogging the Dutch economy (which is not based on agriculture but on services) abroad. One day, I was travelling with a Chinese vice-minister, dutifully making the standard plug on how the country was not dependent on agriculture, telling him that only 4% of the population worked in agriculture. He asked me about the percentage in agricultural products in total exports and I said 20%. AHA, he reacted, enthusiastically. That is what I want to achieve for China!

Another battle lost.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Windmills on Coins
« Reply #10 on: February 20, 2011, 01:05:55 AM »
Leiden. 
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Windmills on Coins
« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2011, 01:45:27 AM »
Not a real coin, but it wants to be one. This is one piece of a series that could be collected from Leiden shopkeepers, who'd also accept it in payment. The high point of the festivities was a recreation of the painting usually called "the Nightwatch" by people from Leiden. The windmill "De Valk", pictured in the skyline, is relatively young (1743), but well maintained. It has 7 floors, all accessible for visitors, which is uncommon.

Leiden was the world's first industrial city. In its heyday, there were hundreds of windmills in and directly around the city, driving all kind of machines from pumps to saws and industrial grinders and mixers (e.g for making paint.) It made the rich richer and it killed the poor, either through alcohol and long working hours or through the unhealthy, stinking air. Its main product was fine textiles. The fibers were softened with urine, collected and kept in the city.

Among Leiden's claims to fame are having been settled by Romans, the oldest university of the country, the oldest plant collection in the country, the first collection point of the pilgrim fathers, a long list of famous inhabitants and withstanding the Habsburg armies.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Windmills on Coins
« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2011, 11:54:17 AM »
Yes, but who wants to live in a city with a name that translates to "suffer"? (duck)

I have some of those pennings (medals) too, e.g. a "dommetje" from Utrecht. No windmill on that one though. Here is a piece that France issued in 2002; it shows the Montmartre quarter in Paris. Oddly enough, I don't see any tourists ...

Christian
« Last Edit: May 08, 2012, 02:48:15 PM by coffeetime »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Windmills on Coins
« Reply #13 on: February 20, 2011, 12:05:09 PM »
Yes, but who wants to live in a city with a name that translates to "suffer"? (duck)

Fortunately, "to suffer" is spelled differently :-X The vagaries of the Dutch language:

"Ik zal mij op deez' wagen wagen.
Die zal mij naar Leiden leiden.
God zal hem met plagen plagen,
die in anders weiden weiden."

:D

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Windmills on Coins
« Reply #14 on: February 20, 2011, 01:07:47 PM »
Nice poem! Admittedly that was a joke from a German POV. Yes, in Dutch "leiden" means "to lead", but in German it means "to suffer". And, well, if you have a "Monster" nearby, you may indeed have to suffer from time to time. :D

Here is another "windmill" coin - a Czech gold piece, for collectors only. But the mill that it depicts is interesting: It is the windmill in Ruprechtov, built around 1870 as a normal windmill so to say. A few years later it was severely damaged in a storm, and then the four destroyed "wings" were replaced by a Halladay wind pump.


(Image: pametni-mince.info)

In the mid-1990s the building was restored. Nowadays you can visit the mill (on just a few days per year) or, upon reservation, even stay there for a week in summer.

Christian