We Want $2 Coins in US!

Started by Bimat, February 13, 2011, 05:47:55 PM

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Bimat

This facebook page:

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=53208186703

wants US government to introduce a $2 coin along with $1 coins and eliminate the $1 bills ;D

Full Description:

This group supports the use of coins in the denomination of one and two dollars for the United States of America, and calls for the elimination of the one dollar bill. The paper money costs too much to make, has a shorter lifespan than the coin, is not accepted in vending machines when old and wrinkled, and is simply not as cool as a coin. Currently, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand use dollar coins. All have eliminated the dollar bill.

Coin Ideas:
1. Mint them with two different metals (bimetallic).
2. Make them slightly larger than a quarter.
3. Introduce one multi-sided coin.
4. Eliminate the penny and the nickel, and introduce a dollar coin with Lincoln, and a two dollar coin with Jefferson.

Not much support though. Only 115 people are supporting the campaign.. ;D

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Prosit

Except for eliminating the cent, I don't see anything there I agree with.
Dale

Figleaf

Quote from: Bimat on February 13, 2011, 05:47:55 PM
The paper money ... is simply not as cool as a coin.

:D Chad's heart is in the right place.

Quote from: Bimat on February 13, 2011, 05:47:55 PM
Currently, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand use dollar coins. All have eliminated the dollar bill.

I am sure you can agree with that, Dale? ;)

Quote from: Bimat on February 13, 2011, 05:47:55 PM
3. Introduce one multi-sided coin.

Apart from the obvious jokes (please put them in a separate thread :)), what does Chad mean here?
Making the dollar coin 7 (difficult qualifiers omitted) sided, like the British 50p coin? A non-round coin would be several hanging, swinging, half broken rope bridges too far for the US. ;D

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

kena

For some reason the modern US dollar coins never caught one (except for slot machines in Las Vegas).

Always had to go to the bank to get Ike dollars and the same for Kennedy Half dollars.  The Susan B. Anthony dollar was a flop as well (the Carter quarter). 

Not sure if a two dollar coin will work either.  Two dollar bill they the relaunched it in 1976 did not catch on as well. 

They are trying again with dollar coins with the Native American and President dollars, so Lincoln was a dollar coin in 2010.

I could imagine the vending machine industry go nuts if a two dollar coin came out and they had to accept the coins.  Remember what happened with SBA dollar coin was released and the new dollar coins have the same signature as the previous coin.

I think whoever tries to stop the penny and the dollar bill will be comitting political suicide.

chrisild

Here is something that the US Mint could play with when thinking about a $2 coin. And no, it is (much to my chagrin) not a cookie. ;)



According to a WBCC article, Schuler presented a new machine at the World Money Fair last month. One that can make bimetallic pieces with "odd" shapes.

And yes, I agree it would be nice if the US actually started using $1 coins (would not even think of $2 coins) and phase those low-value bills out. But of course that is up to them. In other words, it won't happen.

Christian

Prosit

#5
...Currently, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand use dollar coins. All have eliminated the dollar bill....
QuoteI am sure you can agree with that, Dale? ;)
Peter


Ok maybe I will agree with that  ;)

The argument that eliminating the cent and dollar bill and using a dollar coin is a good idea so as to save money is not a really good argument.  If you want to save money, don't be half-arsed, eliminate all coinage and banknotes and go to debit cards.

I am not a proponent of that either ;)

Figleaf

Quote from: dalehall on February 13, 2011, 08:31:47 PM
If you want to save money, don't be half-arsed, eliminate all coinage and banknotes and go to debit cards.

Did you think you were joking?

For the last 20 years or so, the Dutch banks have been trying to persuade their clients to do just that. They started out making available PIN cards. These are "simplified" debit cards: no signing necessary, lose it and you lose your money, the chip's out of order, your problem, don't call the bank. It was a predictable dismal failure. They got the national library system and some university libraries to require PIN cards for making copies, but with a scanner at home that is easily circumvented. They also got some corporate cafeterias to require them, but at least they had machines to put money on your cards and take it off again.

For a while, they got the big cities to require them for parking your car. Some German tourists, arguing that you could not tell foreign tourists to open a bank account in the Netherlands because you want to park your car got told in court they were wrong. Now, Amsterdam has broken rank by starting its own parking system, making the city inaccessible for al but the people who live there. The next thing is that the banks now refuse to handle coins. Most don't handle banknotes either. Public transportation, always the first to cut service, any service, got into the act by introducing yet another payment system. Prepaid, of course. Prepaid telephones are already a way of life.

You remember the old black and white movies where important people had six telephones on their desk, all ringing? Today, you don't have to be important any more to juggle six incompatible payment systems that all keep part of your money for you, free of charge and at your risk. >:( Just having one set of banknotes and coins, all yours, is so hopelessly outdated. :'(

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

akona20

I have always found American money rather a funny set of yesterdays offerings.

Prosit

In the context of the USA at this point in time, yes I was joking.  I have no doubt that is the direction the world is going but we all have to go through the process to get there.  It would not reasonable for us all to be reasonable and do the reasonable thing....we are humans after all.
Dale
 

Quote from: Figleaf on February 13, 2011, 09:08:32 PM
Did you think you were joking?

For the last 20 years or so, the Dutch banks have been trying to persuade their clients to do just that. They started out making available PIN cards. These are "simplified" debit cards: no signing necessary, lose it and you lose your money, the chip's out of order, your problem, don't call the bank. It was a predictable dismal failure. They got the national library system and some university libraries to require PIN cards for making copies, but with a scanner at home that is easily circumvented. They also got some corporate cafeterias to require them, but at least they had machines to put money on your cards and take it off again.

For a while, they got the big cities to require them for parking your car. Some German tourists, arguing that you could not tell foreign tourists to open a bank account in the Netherlands because you want to park your car got told in court they were wrong. Now, Amsterdam has broken rank by starting its own parking system, making the city inaccessible for al but the people who live there. The next thing is that the banks now refuse to handle coins. Most don't handle banknotes either. Public transportation, always the first to cut service, any service, got into the act by introducing yet another payment system. Prepaid, of course. Prepaid telephones are already a way of life.

You remember the old black and white movies where important people had six telephones on their desk, all ringing? Today, you don't have to be important any more to juggle six incompatible payment systems that all keep part of your money for you, free of charge and at your risk. >:( Just having one set of banknotes and coins, all yours, is so hopelessly outdated. :'(

Peter

chrisild

Quote from: Figleaf on February 13, 2011, 09:08:32 PM
Now, Amsterdam has broken rank by starting its own parking system, making the city inaccessible for al but the people who live there.

But that may well have reasons other than doing away with cash. Parking in Amsterdam is difficult, so they want visitors to use public transport (maybe with P+R) or pay a lot for a garage spot. Similarly, many cities not only in Europe make it difficult and/or expensive to enter them with a car. Here in Germany you don't pay toll to get in, but most places require you to have an emission sticker on your windshield. (That is supposed to reduce the emission of particulates.) Those stickers are easy to get here, and pretty much everybody has one now. Visitors from other countries however ...

Christian

akona20

Complicated payment systems are all the rage and every little arm of government seems to require its own little unique system. This of course requires people to run it and it is a well known fact that corporate/government accountants love nothing more than creating vast numbers of accounting staff type people rather than people at the service end. One government department here recently lauded its own increase in 'front line' staff. On investigation it was found that they included their computer and admin staff staff in their new figures because it made them look user friendly.

Cash of course is a proble. With cash at parking stations, train stations and on buses you need somewhere to store it and of course those handling cash are broadly untrustworthy and must be eliminated. Instead you have many card systems most of which require a minimum deposit and automatic top up. This of course leads to a proliferation of your private information into the hands of various government departments. they will even convince you that they are absolutely honest and trustworthy and their systems are tamper proof. Really all it means is the costs are transfered to an enormous pool of trendy electronic gadgetry that is poorly understood by the masses and less so by politicians who are conned into letting this happen.

And of course there are many more freebies given out by the computer people who demand hundreds of millions to implement these new systems. Oh and one of our systems here requires an alpha numeric security code of 12 parts. REally, we aren't as smart as you computer people. And of course it is our fault if something happens.
Hence we have, thankfully, Wikileaks.

villa66

Quote from: Figleaf on February 13, 2011, 06:16:13 PM
...Making the dollar coin 7 (difficult qualifiers omitted) sided, like the British 50p coin? A non-round coin would be several hanging, swinging, half broken rope bridges too far for the US. ;D

Peter

As we're discussing elsewhere, the British 20P and 50P polygonals have a definite following, and from my experience, Americans are intrigued by these coins when they meet them. Part of it, certainly, is that they're British—but I think these coins can stand very happily on their own.

From the reaction I see in people, I don't think it's any great trick to recognize the equilateral curve heptagon as something that doesn't require "difficult modifiers," but only an easy one: cool.

I've thought for a long time that if properly introduced, the equilateral curve heptagon could find a welcome in the American coin series.

:) v.

akona20

The quaint American currency system as I wrote some months ago is rather quaint. Cahances of reforming it are practically zero simply because anything really new is a bit difficult over there.

villa66

Quote from: akona20 on May 26, 2011, 05:16:13 AM
The quaint American currency system as I wrote some months ago is rather quaint. Cahances of reforming it are practically zero simply because anything really new is a bit difficult over there.

Have it your way....

;) v.