Author Topic: Coin museums in the US  (Read 1733 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Coin museums in the US
« on: October 20, 2007, 10:02:47 AM »
The ANA has given up on opening a museum in Washington DC. That seems like a wise decision in view of the Smithsonian collection being based there. ANA nad the San Francisco Historical Society still have plans to fix up the building of the San Francisco Mint and turn it into a gold rush and money museum. I think this would be a valuable addition to the West coast tourist attractions, especially since the ANA's own museum s located with their headquarters in Coorado Springs, an unlikely tourist destination.

Peter
« Last Edit: October 20, 2007, 10:04:24 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Prosit

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Re: Coin museums in the US
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2007, 12:39:26 PM »
From what I understand there is a museum at the old Mint in Carson Ciity and they issue several medals per year.  Last I checked they had a web presence but the museum shop wasn't on-line.  The few medals from them I have seen looked nice and many if not all had a "CC" mintmark  :)  I have never been to a coin museum and the one in Colorodo Springs is the closest that I know of.  Even though I have been to Colorodo Springs several times, I have never made it to the museum.

Dale

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coin museums in the US
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2007, 12:46:33 PM »
I visited the museum in Carson City a long time ago. At the time, it was mostly devoted to mining, the gold rush and local history, but there were some nice numismatic exhibits, including an old coin press and some CC coins. The museum shop sold a book, Mintmark CC, which I bought. I also saw the Smithsonian exhibition in Washington DC, which, while bursting at the seams with oddities and rarities, did not give a good impression of common coins in circulation, unless you already know a thing or two about US coins.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.