Author Topic: NZ: QEII title  (Read 2221 times)

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Offline ghipszky

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NZ: QEII title
« on: December 31, 2010, 02:32:31 AM »
Is it common to have Queen Elizabeth The Second written out on a coin? This coin is from 1964.
Ginger

translateltd

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Re: NZ: QEII title
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2010, 02:40:38 AM »
I used to find that a little odd, too.  England and Australia kept the obverse legends in Latin (until decimalisation in Australia's case) but they were always in English in NZ.  The titles started out as GEORGE V (VI) KING EMPEROR, but after George VI ceased being Emperor of India it was switched to KING GEORGE THE SIXTH, and so the pattern continued with Queen Elizabeth II.


Offline ghipszky

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Re: NZ: QEII title
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2010, 03:22:27 AM »
I think it looks nice though.
Ginger

translateltd

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Re: NZ: QEII title
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2010, 03:46:27 AM »
There are a number of interesting aspects to it in my view - the fact that the legend starts at the 9 o'clock point, and the long tail on the Q, for instance.  Mary Gillick's effigy of the Queen is one I find very good, too - I think we tend to overlook it because we see it on so many coins.

The treatment of the tiki on the reverse is also very good - quite an under-appreciated coin all round, on reflection!


Offline Figleaf

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Re: NZ: QEII title
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2011, 05:20:09 PM »
It's all a question of design. The logical design would have had QUEEN ELIZABETH II above and NEW ZEALAND below the bust. By moving the country name to the reverse, the designer had to cope with a gap. Enlarging the bust would not have been nice as well as a cost item. Enlarging the letters would have made them too large (they are pretty large already, but pleasantly readable that way) and clash with the bust. Increasing the spaces between the letters would have looked childish and ugly. Yet, maybe the designer played with a solution with only half the coin's edge covered in legend, which may explain the "+" at 9 o'clock (anachronism, should have been a •, I think.) Writing the "II" as "THE SECOND" is an excellent solution to the conundrum.

Peter
« Last Edit: January 01, 2011, 07:31:13 PM by translateltd »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

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Re: NZ: QEII title
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2011, 07:32:59 PM »
Since there are bullets between the other words, the + makes it quite clear where the starting point is (especially as it's in an unusual position).  Anachronistic, maybe, because it harks back to a practice from ancient times, but it doesn't jar.

Offline ghipszky

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Re: NZ: QEII title
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2011, 02:59:03 AM »
The friend of mine that passed away that gave me these coins gave me the most interesting that she had collected over yrs of traveling with her parents, from childhood to adulthood. I have a few special world coins that I keep in a bag. They were here in the house when I moved in nearly 19 yrs ago. When I am done learning from Paula's coins I will get these really beautiful coins out and start posting them.
So, on the reverse of this coin is a tiki? They have those in Hawaii. Does the one on this coin represent the same thing as the Hawaiian ones?
Ginger

translateltd

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Re: NZ: QEII title
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2011, 06:03:49 AM »
I'd be surprised if there wasn't a connection - the languages and cultures are related (both Polynesian).  Based on other words I would have expected the Hawaiian word to be "ti'i", though. 

(A quick Google search suggests this is a possible variant:

Hawaiian mythology - Google Books Result
Martha Warren Beckwith, Vassar College. Lucy Maynard Salmon Fund for Research - 1940 - Hawaiian mythology - 575 pages
... the Hawaiians at the time of the arrival of the missionaries in the islands. ... Ti'i (Ki'i or Tiki), and Maui, is closely comparable with the Hawaiian ...
books.google.co.nz/books?isbn=1605069574...)

The mythological ancestral home of the Maori people is called Hawaiki - again, dropping that k and inserting a ' gives you Hawai'i, which is getting a bit too close for coincidence.  Unlikely that the Maori originated in Hawaii, but the name may be an echo of an older, common starting point somewhere in the Pacific (or Formosa, or Central Asia, or Olduvai Gorge ...).





Austrokiwi

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Re: NZ: QEII title
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2011, 07:22:52 AM »
My understanding of the settlement of the pacific is that Polynesians originated around Taiwan ( based on the genetics of the NZ native rat).   More interesting was the direction of travel.  For land lubbers like me one would expect exploration of the pacific would go with the wind when in reality settlement of the pacific went against the wind.   It seems that when one is exploring a large ocean sailing "into the wind" allows one to return should you not find anything.

translateltd

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Re: NZ: QEII title
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2011, 08:11:10 AM »
Hence my reference to "Formosa" above :-)

Offline ghipszky

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Re: NZ: QEII title
« Reply #10 on: January 08, 2011, 03:39:57 AM »
Thanks for the information, it makes sense to me.
Ginger