Author Topic: 2 Sen of Japan (1874), Proof?  (Read 1588 times)

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Offline Numii_Anglii

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2 Sen of Japan (1874), Proof?
« on: October 30, 2010, 11:56:24 AM »
Lovely 2 Sen of Japan (1874), Extra Fine with light edge knock and a Proof?

A lovely example!




Offline Numii_Anglii

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Re: 2 Sen of Japan (1874), Proof?
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2010, 12:57:18 PM »
No comments because I got this one right!  8) :o

Offline andyg

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Re: 2 Sen of Japan (1874), Proof?
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2010, 01:01:22 PM »
yes you did get the date right, it's not a proof though.
If anything it looks to be a high grade coin that's been cleaned and has then retoned.
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

translateltd

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Re: 2 Sen of Japan (1874), Proof?
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2010, 08:08:45 PM »
Paul Withers once gave me a useful tip: if you're not sure whether an item is a proof or not, then it isn't!


Offline Figleaf

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Re: 2 Sen of Japan (1874), Proof?
« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2010, 09:38:09 PM »
It would be better to have the coin in hand, but I tend to agree that it's not a proof. In this time, Japan's modernization drive had resulted in the purchase of up to date mint machinery (they were later on-sold to China, where they remained in service for many more years.) They might have set the weight of the strike too heavy, sacrificing speed for quality. This will produce nice, sharp coins, sometimes even with partial frosting effects. However, since the planchets were not polished before striking, they would not count as proofs. See also this thread.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline gxseries

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Re: 2 Sen of Japan (1874), Proof?
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2010, 01:30:39 PM »
Still worth a fair bit. I'm not too sure if there were any Meiji coins struck in proof but chances are I think there were for many reasons.