Author Topic: LU-CZ: Joint issue commemorates 1310 wedding  (Read 989 times)

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Offline chrisild

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LU-CZ: Joint issue commemorates 1310 wedding
« on: August 30, 2010, 12:30:20 AM »
Don't want to write everything twice :) so please have a look here:
http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,7315.0.html

Christian

Offline Figleaf

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Re: LU-CZ: Joint issue commemorates 1310 wedding
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2010, 01:32:34 AM »
The house of Luxembourg made Bohemia strong, but John's contribution was largely limited to his marriage with Eliabeth of Bohemia. When the 100 years war broke out, John lent his support to the king of France. He was at Crécy, surrounded by his household knights, as he was quite blind. When the Black Prince's wing came under heavy French pressure, a series of misunderstandings probably convinced him that the French had won the battle. Believing that the king would more easily surrender to an important lord like himself, he ordered his party forward. So as not to get lost, the household knights tied their horses to their king's horse, which slowed them down end ended their maneuverability. As they were approaching the front line, king Edward finally released the English reserves, turning the tide and starting a rout. John's party could not or would not turn around and all were killed.

There is a romantic take on the episode, which has a blind man fighting bravely in spite of his handicap and the prince of Wales so admiring John that he adopted his arms. There is no documentary support for this interpretation, but it is so popular, that at Crécy-le-Ponthieu, there is a separate monument for John.

A different interpretation is that John was out to get either the crown prince or the king as his prisoner, so that he would be able to claim an astronomical ransom, so it was his greed that killed him and his household knights. This contention is supported by the fact that his son, Charles, was at the front with the regular troops. According to his rank, John had no business leaving the party of the commanders. He was the highest ranking officer killed.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.