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Sri Lankan Fake

Started by Rangnath, August 31, 2007, 11:33:19 PM

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Rangnath

I have been enjoying the "blundered inscriptions" posts on the Roman Coins forum and thought I would include this example here.  Perhaps it is another instance of quantity over quality. 
I am a very poor speller. I have been known to spell one word three different ways in one page.  I think it's some form of dyslexia.  My wife, a medical doctor, thinks it's because of blunt force injury.  However, if I were going to make a copy of a coin, you'd better believe that I would get the inscription right!  There are several things "wrong" with this 1803 96 stivers coin. I'll leave it to you to find out what they are.   
richie

BC Numismatics

Richie,the style of the lettering & the outline of the elephant gives it away as being a dud,as does the dull grey colour.

To me,it looks like it is made of either lead or white metal.

Aidan.

Rangnath

You're probably right Aidan.  Lead would make it more "silver" like in terms of weight, wouldn't it.
richie

BC Numismatics

Richie,yes it would,as white metal is actually quite light,but not as light as aluminium though.

Aidan.

Figleaf

I don't have a 96 stuivers in my collection, but here's the 48, for comparison. Your fake is touching, Rangnath. Exactly the sort of piece I would be unable to resist in a coin shop. I suppose it's cast and I'd accept it as contemporary.

It reminds me of the street dealer in Hong Kong's Chinatown who rewarded my interest for an obvious fake with the words "very ancient".

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Rangnath

Gosh, in comparison to my coin, yours is a thing of beauty! And look! On yours, they even spell "Government" correctly!
Richie

BC Numismatics

Peter,
 That is a very nice 48 Stivers that you have got there.I've never been offered any of the Cingalese elephant silver coins,but I do have a couple of the coppers with the elephant obverse,& a copper with the King on the obverse & the elephant on the reverse.

Have you ever seen the 1821 Cingalese Rixdollar? I have seen 1,but it is quite a scarce coin.

Aidan.

Figleaf

I think you mean this coin, Aidan. However, it is completely in English; not a word in Sinhalese. Except for Canadian coppers, all pre-Victorian British colonial coins are more difficult to find. It has to do with a deeply flawed economic theory known as mercantilism, which holds that exporting coins is really, really baaad. The last mercantilists are what Americans call "silver bugs".

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.