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Coins and tokens in film

Started by Prosit, August 08, 2010, 12:58:17 AM

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Prosit

Here is a movie screen shot of a 1963 coin used in a Hollywood Movie.
Matt Helm, Murder's Row, Dean Martin and Ann Margret.
They were alone on a boat together (I should have been so lucky) about 1 hour 7 minutes and 27 seconds into my copy.

While I don't attempt to collect Movie coins specifically (and maybe not quite a theme), I think it is an area that is worthy of discussion.

Three questions:
What is the coin?
Do you have it?
What other Movies you can think of that show specific coins?

Dale

<k>

It's a QEII half crown - that is to say, two shillings and sixpence. My weekly pocket money around that time, actually.

Probably still got one somewhere.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

UK Decimal +

No problems with identifying it, but the nearest that I can illustrate is the 1965 version.

It is a British 'half-crown' or 'two shillings and sixpence'.

Old currency (pre-decimalisation).   Four crowns was one pound, although the crown was not a circulating coin in recent times.   The one shown is a half-crown, eight to the pound, it was also two and a half shillings.

One pound = 4 crowns, or 8 half-crowns, or 10 florins, or 20 shillings, or 240 pence - there were also other denominations.

Simply, 12 pence = 1 shilling and 20 shillings = 1 pound.   The coin illustrated was demonetised at the end of 1969 in readyness for decimalisation.

Confused?   Probably, but I was brought up with the system.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Prosit

I have a few Florins but no half crowns.

Dale

Prosit

In the movie Around the World in 80 days....somewhere around 2 hours into the movie, there are two ladies who make a bet that Mr Fogg can't go around the world in 80 days, one says yes one says no....

The bet is 10 Bob (I am not all that familiar with British coins) and one lady puts up her money and it looks like three coins (best I can tell) four at the most but I think it was three.

So is it possible to bet 10 Bob with three coins?

Dale

<k>

Not unless one is a crown (five shillings), plus 2 half crowns. Whether crowns were used as circulation pieces in those days, I don't know.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Prosit

So 10 Bob is 2 crown...  So three coins is technically possible...I wondered about when I saw the movie and reviewed that part several times...they often aren't concerned very much with accuracy   ;)
Dale



Quote from: E.M.U. on October 27, 2010, 04:47:54 AM
Not unless one is a crown (five shillings), plus 2 half crowns. Whether crowns were used as circulation pieces in those days, I don't know.

<k>

> So 10 Bob is 2 crown...

That's correct!

>  I wondered about when I saw the movie ...they often aren't concerned very much with accuracy 

Depends which version you saw. If it was the 1960s version, we were still using the same monetary system, so accuracy should not have been a problem.

I was watching some old 1950s films in the summer with my 11-year-old niece. Somebody was charged "six 'n' six" for a drink. Sasha asked me what it meant and how much it was. When I told her it was equivalent to 32½p, she fell about laughing. You can scarcely buy anything for that price nowadays, and the idea of half a penny tickled her too.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

A bob is a shilling. A 10 shillings bet is an unlikely amount, but oh, well. Indeed, you can pay that amount with a crown (5 shillings) and two half crowns, but it can also be paid with four half crowns, since you say it may have been four coins. Someone who says "bob" is not a "lady of quality". For such lower-class damsels, the highest value coin would be the half crown. The upper classes would bet in guineas (21 shillings). Even at Phileass' time, the crown would circulate sparingly. It was the gift of choice for (grand)children or a christmas present for servants and the like.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Bimat

One of the forum member WillieBoyed2 has listed several movie coins on his website :)

http://www.brianrxm.com/dirhtm/cnsmovie.htm

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Prosit

I knew there was a similar thread started by me but didn't realize it was the same title   :)
Too durn lazy to look for it I guess.  Anyway, maybe because I am a coin collector, anytime I see money being used in a movie, I
wake up and try to see what is being used  ;)

@Figleaf  Nope, they weren't ladies of quality and they both had a snootfull   ;D

Dale


Quote from: Numismatica on October 27, 2010, 04:41:36 PM
Dale forgot a topic which was started by.... Dalehall  :o :D ;)

http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,7142.0.html

Aditya

Prosit

That is very interesting, Thanks!
Dale



Quote from: Numismatica on October 27, 2010, 04:39:52 PM
One of the forum member WillieBoyed2 has listed several movie coins on his website :)

http://www.brianrxm.com/dirhtm/cnsmovie.htm

Aditya

andyg

Quote from: Figleaf on October 27, 2010, 04:04:25 PM
A 10 shillings bet is an unlikely amount,

It's half a pound, seems quite logical.

My Mother was given 5 bob a week pocket money in the late 60's, quite a lot of money (or so she says!)
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Prosit

While the movie may have been made in the 60's, the movie setting is much earlier.
Weather reasonable for the time or not, y'all would have a much better grasp of that than me of course.

Dale
 


Quote from: andyg on October 27, 2010, 05:53:39 PM
It's half a pound, seems quite logical.

My Mother was given 5 bob a week pocket money in the late 60's, quite a lot of money (or so she says!)

WillieBoyd2

I listed some coins used in movies on my website, focusing on US films made before 1960.

Website:
http://www.brianrxm.com

The US Treasury Department made it illegal to show real money, coins or paper,
in films from 1933 to 1960.

The restriction was lifted in 1960, supposedly at the request of film director
Alfred Hitchcock who wanted to use real $100 bills in a film about the motel business.

The films, so far:

Greed / McTeague (1924) US gold, Mercury dimes
The Good Earth (1937) Chinese
The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941) Roman and Canadian
The Maltese Falcon (1941) Chinese and others
Buffalo Bill (1941) US Indian Head pennies
Duel in the Sun (1946) Egyptian medal
The Brasher Doubloon (1947) Title coin imitation
The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948) Mexican peso 1924
King Solomon's Mines (1950) Ethiopian Birr (Dollar)
The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951) Diamonds as money
The Treasure of Lost Canyon (1952) Two-part medal
River of No Return (1954) US Silver dollar
The Wonderful Country (1959) Mexican pesos
To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) US Indian Head pennies
Gidget Goes To Rome (1963) US $10 Liberty Gold
In Cold Blood (1967) US Silver dollar
Caligula (1979) Roman coin imitation
Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984) Portuguese gold moidores
Young Indiana Jones (TV 1992-96) US, French, Great Britain

:)
https://www.brianrxm.com
The Mysterious Egyptian Magic Coin
Coins in Movies
Coins on Television