Author Topic: Prussian Coronation Taler  (Read 2316 times)

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Offline Prussian1

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Prussian Coronation Taler
« on: November 23, 2009, 12:39:21 AM »
I got this Prussian Coronation commemorative Taler for my German States commem set.
Prussian1

Offline Prosit

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Re: Prussian Coronation Taler
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2009, 01:22:28 AM »
oooOOOooo!  Very nice!

Dale

Online Figleaf

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Re: Prussian Coronation Taler
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2009, 01:55:33 AM »
Beautiful detail! This looks like a toned proof. The motto SUUM CUIQUE (to each his own) is more than a little bit ironic for a feller who dethroned over 60 monarchs in the German unification process. I presume the letters stand for Wilhelm Rex and Augusta Regina, but the Latin form of Wilhelm starts with a G ;)

Marie Luise Augusta Katharine was a member of the house of Sachsen-Weimar-Eisenach. This is a branch of the house of Wettin, a very old German noble family, related among others to the house of Windsor through the Sachsen-Coburg-Gotha branch. Her father was grand duke Carl Friedrich, who has two portrait coins in his name, a Thaler 1841 and a 2 Thaler 1840-1848.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Prussian1

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Re: Prussian Coronation Taler
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2009, 02:38:48 AM »
I've spent one full year looking for this coin in a high grade for my collection. They are not easly found here in the US.
Yes, the detail is very sharp, and the coin looks 1000 times better in hand then in this photo. It does have a nice proof like surface with a nice cameo to boot.
Prussian1

Offline jc

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Re: Prussian Coronation Taler
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2011, 10:23:44 PM »
Sorry, I'm not an expert, but do you think it could be a proof coin?

Online Figleaf

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Re: Prussian Coronation Taler
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2011, 10:40:59 PM »
It sure looks like a toned proof to me.

There are two schools of thought. One would leave it like it is, which is the safest anyway. The other would try to restore the proof effect, running the chance of ruining it through a wrong treatment. If the coin were mine, I would treat it, but it's your decision to make, not mine!

If you decide to treat, here is a recipe. You need some cotton-wool, sodium, lemon juice, water and some soft cloth (old baby clothes are perfect).

1. Sprinkle sodium on coin
2. Drop lemon juice on sodium, not on coin, mixture will react
3. When reaction has ended, neutralize quickly with plenty of water
4. Repeat on second side
5. Dry coin well with cloth. Leave on heating for a few hours to make sure it is 100% dry

This has worked for me, but there's no guarantee. It's your risk.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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Prussian Coronation Taler
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2011, 06:17:43 AM »
Make sure that you are handling sodium with proper care! And it shouldn't come in contact with water directly ;) I know its effects, we used to celebrate 'mini Diwali' by doing so in our lab  :D

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline jc

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Re: Prussian Coronation Taler
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2011, 08:23:08 PM »
Thanks for your replies and opinions.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Prussian Coronation Taler
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2011, 08:34:50 PM »
Bad translation. Sorry. In English, the product is "sodium bicarbonate" (NaHCO3). This is a mild product used to counteract indigestion. It will react with acids to give a salt and carbonic acid, which readily decomposes to carbon dioxide and water.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.