Author Topic: Unusual Denomination Systems  (Read 13553 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #30 on: August 10, 2011, 10:30:41 PM »
There's a weird reason (after the fact) for the state of the Surinam coins. Hold on to your arm rests: Surinam coins have had two denominations.

The coins were introduced as parts of the Surinam gulden. Surinam got itself into a spiral of drugs smuggling and laundering money of local Maffia clans fighting to be the government. The winning capo was Desi Bouterse. The domestic killing, necessary to get him in power caused great economic losses and the political instability scared off investors, while the Dutch stopped their subsidies to the state. The result was a firm bout of inflation. The coins lost their function as the currency went down the drain.

In 2004, a new currency was introduced, the Surinam dollar of 1000 surinam gulden. The coins were declared valid for 1000 times their original value, a windfall profit for those who had held on to their old coins.

Peter
« Last Edit: August 11, 2011, 12:52:07 AM by Figleaf »
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Offline andyg

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #31 on: August 10, 2011, 10:52:44 PM »
Two more current '3' coins are Cuba's 3 Pesos and Azerbaijan's 3 Qapiks.
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline <k>

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #32 on: August 11, 2011, 12:49:12 AM »
Kazakhstan issued a 3 tenge coin in 1993.

Kyrgyzstan issued a 3 som coin in 2008.

Tajikistan has issued a 3 somonj coin in various years.

Uzbekistan issued a 3 tiyin coin in 1994.


Of all the post-Soviet "-stans", only Turkmenistan has avoided a "3" unit.
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Offline Bimat

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Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #33 on: August 11, 2011, 08:07:41 AM »
Don't forget the Luxembourgian 700 cents coin which was issued recently. It was NCLT, though.

Cook Islands also have (triangular) circulating $3 coin.

Aditya
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Offline <k>

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #34 on: August 14, 2011, 08:04:40 PM »

Cook Islands also have (triangular) circulating $3 coin.

Aditya


One dollar per side?  ;D  You are mistaken - it is a two dollar coin. You must be thinking of their $3 banknotes.  ;

 
« Last Edit: June 12, 2019, 11:33:33 PM by <k> »
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Offline Bimat

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Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #35 on: August 15, 2011, 07:05:17 AM »
Sorry I was confused! But a $3 banknote?!?! That's VERY weird!

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline <k>

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #36 on: August 20, 2011, 04:45:42 PM »
If you look back through Brazil's numismatic history, you'll find denominations of 40 reis, 80 reis, 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 reis. But the one that wins the prize for eccentricity is the 960 reis. Whoever came up with that idea should have been sacked on the spot.
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #37 on: August 20, 2011, 06:00:40 PM »
Whoever came up with that idea should have been sacked on the spot.

Not so fast please. :) Would have to look this up, but I think that at that time, 960 reis was the equivalent of the Spanish 8 reales coin, aka piece of eight (real de a ocho) aka Spanish Dollar. Can anybody else confirm this maybe?

Christian

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #38 on: August 20, 2011, 07:47:48 PM »
Confirmed. 960 reis = 3 patacas = 1 patacão = 1 pieza de a ocho. There are also Brazilian coins of 640 reis, 320 reis, 160 reis 80 reis and 40 reis. The 960 reis connects Brazilian money with Spanish colonial money. Moreover, Spanish colonial pesos were counterstamped after January 1821 in Brazil to be circulated for 960 reis.

Peter
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #39 on: August 21, 2011, 03:26:42 PM »
The 'problem' with 960 is not with the number of units but the failure to use a larger, more logical unit, if you see what I mean. It's not unusual for coins to have a notional value of 960 x a smaller unit; every UK coin worth £1 minted until 1956 is such, being worth 960 farthings. It's just that we don't denominate coins larger than threefarthings in farthings.