Author Topic: Unusual Denomination Systems  (Read 13564 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #15 on: August 10, 2011, 12:39:52 AM »
As for the "3" unit within a decimal series, I was surprised to see that the USA had a 3 cents coin from 1851 to 1873.

Again, the Soviets used a 3 kopeck coin, but the post-Soviet Russians have never issued one.

Communist-era Romania issued a 3 bani coin in the 1950s and a 3 lei coin in the 1960s.

Further back, the French issued 3 centimes coins in the 1800s.

These days, I know of no "3" unit still existing within a decimal series.

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Offline <k>

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #16 on: August 10, 2011, 12:42:35 AM »
The "4" unit within a decimal series. I found both a 4 centesimos and 40 centesimos for Uruguay in the 1800s. I can't think of any other "4" units offhand.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #17 on: August 10, 2011, 12:46:14 AM »
Fosseway mentioned that Venezuela reintroduced the 12½ centimos in 2007, allegedly because it reminded President Chavez of his childhood. Presumably this is the only example of a "12½" unit still circulating within a decimal series. Or am I wrong?
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Offline <k>

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #18 on: August 10, 2011, 12:53:33 AM »
The "2½" unit. I can't think of anywhere in the world that uses this now. Can you? When Britain went decimal in 1971, the old pre-decimal sixpence was still very popular, so a campaign was started to keep it. It was kept, but with a decimal value of 2½p, it became very UNpopular. I guess people don't like messy fractions.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #19 on: August 10, 2011, 12:56:55 AM »
The "½" unit. Britain had a pre-decimal halfpenny until 1968. The decimal halfpenny lasted from 1971 until the end of 1983. It was not missed or mourned. How many countries still use a "½" unit these days?

Apart from a few anomalies, it seems that the vast majority of monetary systems these days use only units of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 25, and 50. Units of 3, 4, 12½, 15, etc., have dropped out.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2011, 07:18:24 PM by coffeetime »
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Offline Bimat

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Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #20 on: August 10, 2011, 08:45:17 AM »
These days, I know of no "3" unit still existing within a decimal series.
I can think of Slovenian €3 commemorative coins which can be had for face value and are legal tender only in Slovenia, but AFAIK, they circulate to a very very limited extent (won't say that they do not circulate at all) so kind of NCLT only.

Aditya
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #21 on: August 10, 2011, 09:38:27 AM »
IIRC both Cyprus and Malta had 3 mil coins up to the early 1980s, when both countries abolished the mil and switched to £ and cents.

Not current, of course, but the Weimar Republic issued a 4 pfennig coin, alongside the more obvious 1, 2 and 5pf ones, in the early 1930s.

The UK issues non-circulating 3p and 4p coins for the Royal Maundy.

On 2½, the Netherlands and its colonies had coins of this denomination for a long time. Portugal had 2$50 coins until the late 1980s (presumably they went when the 50 centavos coin was dropped). South Africa still issues 2½c coins -- the continuation of the old threepence or tickey -- as non-circulating commemoratives, because of the iconic status the tickey had before decimalisation.

40 is another unusual but findable denomination. France made 40-franc gold pieces in the mid-19th century, alongside a decimal system that was otherwise unexceptional in its choice of denominations. Cuba has/had 40 centavo coins.

(Sorry for the vagueness of this -- I'm at work and can't look anything up!)

Then there are some completely wacky denominations. I'm sure when browsing through KM I've seen Austrian and German States coins with denominations of 7 and even 17. I struggle to see how these fit into any currency system I've ever heard of -- apart from anything else they're both quite large (for the context) prime numbers, therefore indivisible.

And let us not forget the marvel that was Jersey before 1872, when they had coins denominated as 1/13th, 1/26th and 1/52nd of a shilling.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #22 on: August 10, 2011, 10:45:39 AM »
The 7 and 17 denominations came from a currency reform. They make sense in te reformed currency but are expressed in the new currency.

I think the world record for denomination weirdness goes to this humble coin. No one has ever been able to show what 5 1/16 means or refers to. There are just theories, all sounding odd. This coin was used as a duit in the Netherlands Indies.

Peter
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Offline Abhay

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #23 on: August 10, 2011, 11:12:15 AM »
Well, this topic reminds me of a Joke, I read a long time back.

A counterfeiter, by mistake, prints a bundle of 15 Rupee notes. Reluctant to destroy the notes, he tries to use the notes in a small village, thinking that the villagers will be ignorant of 15 rupee notes. He goes to a moneylender, and asks whether he can get the change for 15 rupee notes. The Moneylender says that he can give him the change, but will charge a commission of 1 rupee per note. The counterfeiter agrees, and hands over the bundle of 15 rupee notes. The monelender takes out 2 bundles of 7 rupee notes, and hands over them to the Counterfeiter. ;D ;D >:D >:D

Abhay
INVESTING IN YESTERDAY

Offline <k>

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #24 on: August 10, 2011, 12:28:28 PM »
I can think of Slovenian €3 commemorative coins which can be had for face value and are legal tender only in Slovenia, but AFAIK, they circulate to a very very limited extent (won't say that they do not circulate at all) so kind of NCLT only.

Aditya

That's like the commemorative crowns (5 shillings) issued in the UK in the 1960s. Our highest circulating coin back then was the half crown. I notice also that Malaysia produced 25 sen coins as part of its Endangered Species series in recent years, but they do not have a standard circulation 25 sen; they do have circulation 20 sen coins, though.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2011, 07:59:09 PM by coffeetime »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #25 on: August 10, 2011, 12:29:39 PM »
Well, this topic reminds me of a Joke, I read a long time back.

A counterfeiter, by mistake, prints a bundle of 15 Rupee notes. Reluctant to destroy the notes, he tries to use the notes in a small village, thinking that the villagers will be ignorant of 15 rupee notes. He goes to a moneylender, and asks whether he can get the change for 15 rupee notes. The Moneylender says that he can give him the change, but will charge a commission of 1 rupee per note. The counterfeiter agrees, and hands over the bundle of 15 rupee notes. The moneylender takes out 2 bundles of 7 rupee notes, and hands over them to the Counterfeiter. ;D ;D >:D >:D

Abhay

So the moneylender must have been counterfeiting too.  >:(
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #26 on: August 10, 2011, 01:08:59 PM »
Not current, of course, but the Weimar Republic issued a 4 pfennig coin, alongside the more obvious 1, 2 and 5pf ones, in the early 1930s.

Well, they tried, and it failed (of course ;D ). See here:
http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,9659.0.html

The German Empire also had the "3" denomination, but only as 3M (monarchy) and 3 RM (republic), not as pfennigs.

Christian

Offline Bimat

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Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #27 on: August 10, 2011, 07:03:32 PM »
Another unusual denomination I just saw: Suriname 250 cents coin. Why didn't they call it 2.5 Gulden?

Aditya
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Offline <k>

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #28 on: August 10, 2011, 07:08:54 PM »
And Eritrea has a circulating "ONE HUNDRED CENTS" coin.
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Unusual Denomination Systems
« Reply #29 on: August 10, 2011, 10:05:22 PM »
This explanation - which is about the piece from Eritrea but mentions Suriname too - makes some sense to me: "With the coins as they are all the people need to know is that all coins are in units of which there are 100 to the unit of the papermoney. So there is no need to read the denomination name - just the number." http://www.wbcc.fsnet.co.uk/af-eri.htm Sure, the coins from Suriname do have the word "cent" but it may still be easier to use one unit for them all ...

Christian