Author Topic: Coin photography with an iPhone  (Read 6537 times)

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Offline bububoy

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Re: Coin photography with an iPhone
« Reply #30 on: July 10, 2020, 11:19:02 AM »
will this work for coins with shiny surface.. like a gold coin or a copper proof coin ?

regards,

mahe

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coin photography with an iPhone
« Reply #31 on: July 10, 2020, 11:57:35 AM »
It will definitely work. It is just a question of finding the right light. You don't want the light to hit the coin directly. This is easy.

Set up the stand. I use an upside down whiskey glass with the phone resting on top of it, with the lens sticking out. Preferably use a table lighted with daylight (evening light is nicer for shiny coins) you can walk around. Put the coin on the table and observe it through the phone screen as you turn it around. Do not stand in the source of the light. You will see the details coming out differently at different angles. Choose the best angle.

Now equip yourself a sheet of blank, white A4 paper. Walk around the table and hold the paper at different angles to change the lighting. Watch the effect on the screen of your phone. Some phones require a few seconds before they adjust their settings. You may decide you don't need the paper after all. Take your time. When you found the best setup, click. When still in doubt, make pictures with different lighting. It costs practically nothing and deleting a picture is easy.

Note that this approach also works for non-shiny coins.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline bububoy

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Re: Coin photography with an iPhone
« Reply #32 on: July 10, 2020, 12:17:28 PM »
aha.. thanks for the tips peter, this will be my small weekend project..

regards,

mahe

It will definitely work. It is just a question of finding the right light. You don't want the light to hit the coin directly. This is easy.

Set up the stand. I use an upside down whiskey glass with the phone resting on top of it, with the lens sticking out. Preferably use a table lighted with daylight (evening light is nicer for shiny coins) you can walk around. Put the coin on the table and observe it through the phone screen as you turn it around. Do not stand in the source of the light. You will see the details coming out differently at different angles. Choose the best angle.

Now equip yourself a sheet of blank, white A4 paper. Walk around the table and hold the paper at different angles to change the lighting. Watch the effect on the screen of your phone. Some phones require a few seconds before they adjust their settings. You may decide you don't need the paper after all. Take your time. When you found the best setup, click. When still in doubt, make pictures with different lighting. It costs practically nothing and deleting a picture is easy.

Note that this approach also works for non-shiny coins.

Peter