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Double Denominations

Started by <k>, June 29, 2010, 11:43:57 PM

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FosseWay

I was thinking how surprisingly uniform the word for 'one' is in the Turkic languages -- they all seem to have 'bir' (whether spelt in the Latin or Cyrillic alphabets). Compare the Indo-European languages, which vary hugely. Here only two subfamilies are represented (Slavic and Baltic) but even then, without knowledge of the history of those subfamilies you'd be hard pressed to identify a relationship between 'odin' and 'viens'.

translateltd

Quote from: FosseWay on February 20, 2012, 02:10:28 PM
without knowledge of the history of those subfamilies you'd be hard pressed to identify a relationship between 'odin' and 'viens'.

"Odin" is hard to tie in, but at least it's not too much of a stretch to get from "viens/vienas" to the Latin "unus".

"Yak" (in Cyrillic letters) was interesting, as that presumably ties in with "Ek" in Hindi/Urdu somewhere.

translateltd

The William IV gold mohurs read "ashrafi" in Urdu as well as "mohur" in English; and from the thread "Why Annas and Pice both?", there are examples of half rupees that read "8 annas" in Urdu.


ciscoins

Quote from: translateltd on February 21, 2012, 01:19:35 AM
"Odin" is hard to tie in, but at least it's not too much of a stretch to get from "viens/vienas" to the Latin "unus".

"Odin" (or "adin", because the unstressed "o" sounds like "a") can be close to German "ein".
Ivan
Moscow, Russia

translateltd

Quote from: ciscoins on February 21, 2012, 06:36:11 AM
"Odin" (or "adin", because the unstressed "o" sounds like "a") can be close to German "ein".

... and thus to a common ancestor with unus, vienas etc.

Enlil

The Danish West Indies last issue was denominated in 1 franc = 1 daler, and if you are including more than one language than Hong Kong, Macau, China, Taiwan, Afghanistan, Syria, Lebanon, Iran, Iraq etc generally those that do not use the Latin script.

<k>

The East Africa and Uganda Protectorate was renamed as simply East Africa in 1920. After that, the 50 cents coins were doubly denominated as fifty cents / half shilling.
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<k>

There is a one year type of the East African 10 cents dated 1964, where the denomination appears in Swahili. Compare it with the 1956 version to see what it normally would have looked like. Note: the images are not to scale. The 1956 and 1964 versions are the same size.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#53
The Australian florin was doubly denominated under Edward VII and George V, but it became simply a florin under George VI.











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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#54
Somalia 10 cents 1967.jpg

Somalia, 10 cents, 1967.

Somalia gave its denominations in Italian and English in the 1960s.
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<k>

Angola, 20 centavos / 4 macutas, 1927.
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<k>

#56


Dominican Republic, half peso / 12½  grams, 1963.  But don't be fooled - it simply weighs 12.5 grams!
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FosseWay

Quote from: <k> on December 01, 2012, 02:56:49 AM
Somalia gave its denominations in Italian and English in the 1960s.

And in a third language in the Arabic alphabet -- the Arabic reads, approximately, 1 shilling and 10 centesimi respectively, though I don't know whether it's actually Arabic or something else. Somali is generally written in the Latin alphabet, at least these days.

chrisild

Well, the digits do say "1" and "10" respectively. As for the language, according to the Schön catalog the text is in Arabic. Those 1967 coins were apparently designed by Michael Rizzello.

Christian

FosseWay

The words following the digits approximate to shilling and centesimi in Arabic, but as these are not Arabic words, I've no way of determining whether the language is Arabic. It could be some other language that uses the same script, in which the words shilling and centesimi take the same form. Compare the ubiquity of the word 'cent' in the western context.