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Double Denominations

Started by <k>, June 29, 2010, 11:43:57 PM

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FosseWay

I've often wondered why the Eritrean 100 cent coin issued in 1997 (KM48) is denominated thus, not 1 nakfa. It doesn't, however, have two denominations, so apologies for the mission creep...

<k>

Quote from: FosseWay on August 25, 2011, 04:43:30 PM
I've often wondered why the Eritrean 100 cent coin issued in 1997 (KM48) is denominated thus, not 1 nakfa. It doesn't, however, have two denominations, so apologies for the mission creep...

But we like digressions here. My topic title refers to one sort of anomaly, and your example refers to another, so we're on track...
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

Quote from: chrisild on August 25, 2011, 04:37:38 PM
I know they started doing that in 1815 but for some reason with the 1 gulden coin only. Does the 2½ gulden coin say "250 C"? Nah ...

In 1815, a decimal currency was introduced. Disregarding the ill-received 3 Gulden, the rijksdaalder was the same coin it was before Napoleonic times: a large silver piece of 50 (most of the time) stuivers. So was the gulden of 20 stuivers. Yet, there was an important difference. Before, the unit of account were the rijksdaalder and the stuiver. Afterwards, the unit of account was the gulden and the cent. The cent was new and had to be explained. You can do that the Indian way: 1 naya paisa is 1/100th rupee, or you can do it the other way around and remind people that the gulden now has 100 cent. The advantage is exactly the one you remark on. You don't have to put the double denomination on all the coins if you don't want to.

Yet, they did and there was a "reason." This may look like a Dutch coin, but in fact, it only circulated in the Netherlands East Indies. Apparently, it was felt that people there needed an extra reminder.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Vivek

Quote from: Figleaf on August 25, 2011, 02:49:33 PM
Didn't realize that, but it makes sense, of course. Can you help with the exact text, Vivek?

Peter
Hello Peter
It is written one Hundredth of repuee. These series coins have information of fraction of rupee details.
Like 10 paise 1/10 of rupee
2 paise 1/20 th of rupee
both units have been mentioned...paisa and rupee..
Vivek

Magus

Chile introduced the "condor" as a superunit meaning 10 pesos, in 1925 according to Wikipedia. No idea why. The "condor" denomination vanished when the 1st peso was replaced by the escudo, hasn't been reintroduced even after the 2nd peso replaced the escudo.

chrisild

Another dual denomination piece - a 10 Polish zlotych or 1 1/2 Russian rubles coin in the style of a Family Ruble. I don't collect those, and this one I could certainly not afford. ;) The image below is from this auction report. The coin was sold two weeks ago, at Künker's WMF auction, and the "hammer price" was a whopping €650,000.

Christian

bart

Did someone already mention the Danish West Indies?
Here's an example of a 2 francs/40 cents.
I found this one here

chrisild

Quote from: bart on February 16, 2012, 03:58:57 PM
Did someone already mention the Danish West Indies?

Not in this context - coffeetime only showed us one side, hehe.
http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,13632.msg94132.html#msg94132
To be fair, he also brought up the "cent/bit" coins from there in this topic:
http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,9073.0.html

Christian

<k>

#38
And I did another topic on the same general subject:

Danish West Indies







Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

translateltd

Quote from: malj1 on August 25, 2011, 02:31:01 PM
How about a banknote with double denomination. 1915.
The Dardanelles Campaign Overprint, 10/- or Piastres silver 60 and Piastres silver sixty.



I've been trying to get the catalogues to correct this one for some time now: it says "60 silver piastres", given that the Arabic script that was used to write Turkish in those days reads right-to-left.  Whoever transcribed it was trying to read it left-to-right.


translateltd

#40
Couple of other ones that I don't think have been mentioned here:

Gambia, 4 shillings 1966 (the denomination is given as "dalasi" and "dërëm" in a couple of local languages in addition to the English version, see http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,12529.msg86508.html#msg86508 )

Japan, first series of 1/2 and 1 sen in the 1870s, which describe the value as 1/200 and 1/100 yen, respectively.




malj1

#41
Quote from: translateltd on February 16, 2012, 11:31:34 PM
I've been trying to get the catalogues to correct this one for some time now: it says "60 silver piastres", given that the Arabic script that was used to write Turkish in those days reads right-to-left.  Whoever transcribed it was trying to read it left-to-right.


Thanks for that, its obvious now you point it out! I have since acquired a contemporary forgery of the pound, where the same thing would apply; the real note commands a huge price these days.



£1 or 120 silver Piastres and one hundred and twenty silver Piastres
[I will amend my site]
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

milkshakespeare

I believe that the current Saudi Arabian coins have their denominations expressed in halalas and ghirsh or fractions of riyal. (100 halala = 20 ghirsh = 1 riyal)

Also, in Iraq during the kingdom period, the 50 fils coin often carried a denomination of 1 dirhem.

ciscoins

All the Soviet banknotes had the denomination written in 15 languages (or 16 - before 1956), because the currency had 15 official names. Some of them were just variations of the word "rouble", but the others were different:

Ukrainian - karbovanets
Azerbaijani and Turkmen - manat
Georgian - maneti
Belarussian - rubel'
Russian - rubl'
Estonian - rubla
Moldovan - rublă
Armenian - rubli
Latvian and Lithuanian - rublis
Kazakh and Kyrgyz - som
Uzbek - sum
Ivan
Moscow, Russia

Figleaf

Seems the word for "one" is even more different in different languages.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.