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Double Denominations

Started by <k>, June 29, 2010, 11:43:57 PM

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a3v1

Assumptions correct! For some time the Belga was just the name for an equivalent of five Francs.
Regards,
a3v1
Over half a century of experience as a coin collector.
-------------
Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

Figleaf

Wikipedia says:

In 1926, Belgium, as well as France, experienced depreciation and an abrupt collapse of confidence, leading to the introduction of a new gold currency for international transactions, the belga worth 5 francs, and the country's withdrawal from the monetary union, which ceased to exist at the end of the year. The belga was tied to the British pound at a rate of 35 belgas (175 francs) = 1 pound and was thus put on a gold standard of 1 belga = 209.211 mg fine gold.

However, the idea didn't catch on and in 1935, following great hardship during the crisis of the thirties, the Belgian franc was devalued by 28% to 150.632 mg fine gold, which broke the link with the pound. Thereafter, the Belga was abandoned.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

#17
Portuguese India, 1871.  One tanga = 60 Réis.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#18
Newfoundland, 1882. TWO HUNDRED CENTS / ONE HUNDRED PENCE / 2 DOLLARS.

Remember that Britain didn't have decimal currency in those days, so the 100 pence equalled 8 shillings and fourpence.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

bart

Another one: Bolivia 1893 : 1/2 Boliviano / 50 Centavos

FosseWay

The predecimal, pre-1871 currency of Prussia included numerous coins of the type illustrated below:



This one is 1 pfennig or 1/360 taler; I have similar bronze coins denominated as 2 pf and 1/180; 3 pf and 1/120; and 4 pf and 1/90.

The silver coins have a similar double denomination:



2½ Silbergroschen = 1/12 taler; I also have 1 Silbergroschen = 1/30 taler.

These double denominations show how versatile non-decimal currency systems can be in terms of being divisible by the maximum number of factors (360 is even better in that regard than the UK's 240), but equally the fact that the coins had to show the conversion rate implies that there was some confusion or difficulty on the part of users.

Vivek

Naya paisa series had both paisa and rupee mentioned on it...I am not sure this will fall under this thread...
Vivek

chrisild

Quote from: FosseWay on August 25, 2011, 01:10:57 PM
The predecimal, pre-1871 currency of Prussia included numerous coins of the type illustrated below

Those are fine coins, but I would not actually count them as double denomination pieces. As you explained, the value is simply expressed in two different ways - it's as if a modern British 20p coin said "TWENTY PENCE - 5 ONE POUND". But maybe I am just a little too strict here. :)

Christian

malj1

How about a banknote with double denomination. 1915.
The Dardanelles Campaign Overprint, 10/- or Piastres silver 60 and Piastres silver sixty.

Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

FosseWay

Quote from: chrisild on August 25, 2011, 02:05:56 PM
Those are fine coins, but I would not actually count them as double denomination pieces. As you explained, the value is simply expressed in two different ways - it's as if a modern British 20p coin said "TWENTY PENCE - 5 ONE POUND". But maybe I am just a little too strict here. :)

Agreed, but they're along the same lines as the Belga coins illustrated upthread.  ;)

Figleaf

Quote from: Vivek on August 25, 2011, 01:23:29 PM
Naya paisa series had both paisa and rupee mentioned on it...I am not sure this will fall under this thread...

Didn't realize that, but it makes sense, of course. Can you help with the exact text, Vivek?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Figleaf

Spot the double denomination :)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

asm

Quote from: Figleaf on August 25, 2011, 02:49:33 PM
Didn't realize that, but it makes sense, of course. Can you help with the exact text, Vivek?
Peter

The coin mentions 1 Naya Paisa (center), 1/100th part of a Rupee (on the edge).

Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

<k>

Quote from: chrisild on August 25, 2011, 02:05:56 PM
Those are fine coins, but I would not actually count them as double denomination pieces. As you explained, the value is simply expressed in two different ways - it's as if a modern British 20p coin said "TWENTY PENCE - 5 ONE POUND". But maybe I am just a little too strict here. :)

Christian

As the originator of the topic 8) I simply meant that the denomination should be expressed in two (or more!) ways: so 10 cents and 1 shilling goes, as does (one I posted earlier) two hundred cents and two dollars.  :)
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild

Ah yes, then those examples do make sense here. Even Peter's "100 C" gulden. :) Which is somewhat strange by the way; I know they started doing that in 1815 but for some reason with the 1 gulden coin only. Does the 2½ gulden coin say "250 C"? Nah ...

Christian