Author Topic: Religious token in the style of an Akbar Square Rupee (in the name of Jahangir)  (Read 2962 times)

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Offline sekharkausik

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About 12 years ago a wellwisher of mine brought this coin for me for Rs. 100/-. Although by browsing through the various books on coins I saw it was Jehangir but with very crude caligraphy.The year 1020 H, the weight is 12 grams, dimensions were 18x18x18x19 mm.
I showed these coins to a few dealers and experts and they all told me it was a fake.

While browsing through books in the National Museunm library at Janpath, New Delhi, I saw two coins of the same listed in a book by BROWN. ( I do not recollect the name of the author now). Though the dates were different, the mint was KATAK.

I had met a collector in Bombay and on seeing this coin said " Kausik- This is a very rare coin. All these experts in connivance with the dealers are duping you. Keep it very carefully and dont part with it.

I will be very grateful if the FORUM can analyse and advise me about this coin.   Thanking you,   SEKHAR KAUSIK
« Last Edit: June 20, 2010, 05:18:18 AM by Overlord »

Offline Oesho

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Re: JEHANGIR - CRUDE
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2010, 12:40:04 AM »
It's a Sunni Moslim religious token. Most of these tokens are copies of Akbar coins, but this has a crude representation of the name of Jahangir. The obv. shows the Kalima, with the names of the first for Sunni Caliphs around.

Offline Figleaf

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May we conclude from the shroff marks that a) it is good silver and b) it was used as money?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Salvete

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Their primary purpose was as a religious token, amulet or charm, Figleaf, for which the weight was not crucial, and varied a bit.  If modern collectors are fooled into buying a few of the solid silver ones as rupees (and who among us wasn't, when we first started collecting?) it is reasonable to presume that some people in Mughal times might also have been tricked into accepting tokens of reasonable weight as rupees from time to time.  Like so many questions, Figleaf, unless the matter is dealt with in some contemporaneous travellers' tales or if 'The Ain' or similar has  nothing to say about it, we could only be certain of the facts if we had a Time Machine and travelled back to Akbarabad, Mahayetigarh or Yogibearpur bazaar and watched what was going on.  Probably the brass-cored ones would soon have been found out and discarded, along with the hand of the one tendering it to pay his taxes. 

However, just because you and I have not noticed any reference to such transactions, doesn't mean there are none, so maybe somebody can tell us more about it?  As Abhay said earlier this week, Oesho carries two libraries in his head!

Salvete
Ultimately, our coins are only comprehensible against the background of their historical context.

Offline sekharkausik

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Shailen Bhandare:

Here is the scan of 4 coins of Jahangir Bang I have seen so far .. 1st two in private collection, 3rd in Laucknow museum & last one in Dhaka Museum collection ( I was only able to take obv pic by my mobile phn whn they exhibited their collection last week. But date 1016 is clear enough).



Offline sekharkausik

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Catalogue of coins in the provincial Musuem Lucknow - C. J. Brown ,   catalogue of coins in the Provincial Musuem Lucknow by C.J. Brown - VOL - II - Page no 153 under JEHANGIR - COIN NO 1760. and 1761 - ( 2 )



Ansari

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Calligraphy is too crude to be real ....... Sorry but dealers are correct in their obsevation!

akona20

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This books are right 99% of the time. This time they are incorrect. Oesho et al are correct.