Author Topic: French India: 1/2 Doudou, "Fleur-de-lys"-type, ND (1720-1835), KM#34  (Read 1559 times)

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Offline Overlord

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  • Tamdiu discendum est, quamdiu vivas
    • Collect Old Coins
Mass=2.2 g

Obverse


Reverse
« Last Edit: October 03, 2014, 06:42:22 PM by Quant.Geek »

Offline Salvete

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Hello, Overlord - we meet again......

Do you find it strange that the cache coins of this type (about 2.0 to 2.2g.) are found in round-ish and square-ish shapes, but the Dudus (about 3.7 to 3.9g.) appear to be found in only round-ish shape, sometimes with more corners than a circle should have, but not really square, so far as I have seen?  ???  The French colonial coins are, to my mind, a really attractive series.  Sometimes a little expensive, but mostly still available easily enough, I think.

Salvete
Ultimately, our coins are only comprehensible against the background of their historical context.

Offline Figleaf

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Just a theory. The difference in size of the coins may have been important in the shape of the flan. These coins were produced by cutting slices from a roll of copper, much like a sausage.

To check my theory, you can experiment with a roll of dough. It is relatively easy to roll the dough in a thick sausage shape with your hands. Start with a ball and roll with appropriate pressure.

The thinner the sausage becomes, the more important it is to exert the right pressure, to have a smooth working plane and not to have an lumps in the dough, even to have sausages that are not too long. Any of these will cause deformations in the roundness of the sausage, making it look more squarish. Further inexpert rolling the sausage will tend to reinforce the squarishness of the sausage. In this way, with a material that is thicker and much more difficult to handle than dough, slices of thicker sausages would tend to be more round.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Salvete

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Mmmmmm!  Sausages!

That is an interesting thought, Peter.  Let me think about it.....

Salvete
Ultimately, our coins are only comprehensible against the background of their historical context.