Author Topic: UK national transport tokens  (Read 45592 times)

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Offline chrisild

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Re: UK national transport tokens
« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2010, 08:59:26 AM »
May make sense to contact Stagecoach and ask about those tokens:
http://www.stagecoachgroup.com/scg/about/groupstructure/overview/
(scroll to the bottom)

Christian

Offline africancoins

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Re: UK national transport tokens
« Reply #16 on: July 31, 2010, 10:31:52 PM »
I now have a National Transport 1 Pound token with the privy marks. Here is an image of the dated side...

Thanks Mr Paul Baker

Offline africancoins

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Re: UK national transport tokens
« Reply #17 on: July 31, 2010, 10:34:09 PM »
...and here is a closer image for the date and privy marks.

I now notice that on the other side... the encircled "R" (symbol for registered trademark) on this piece is a fairly small and is different to that on the two other 1 Pound tokens shown earlier in this topic. Image another day perhaps.

Thanks Mr Paul Baker

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK national transport tokens
« Reply #18 on: July 31, 2010, 10:56:16 PM »
I met a gentleman who's handling the pension fund of the group. He gave me the name of the person to contact. Even so, I received no answer to my mail.

I can confirm that those are the marks of the Utrecht mint (right) and mintmaster (left). Please do add the other side, Paul. There's very little info on these pieces, so the more is published, the better.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline a3v1

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Re: UK national transport tokens
« Reply #19 on: July 31, 2010, 10:56:30 PM »
These privy marks suggest that these tokens were struck at the Royal Dutch Mint in Utrecht.
Regards,
a3v1
Over half a century of experience as a coin collector.
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Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK national transport tokens
« Reply #20 on: August 14, 2010, 05:18:55 PM »
Oakham castle would be a fitting subject for a commemorative coin, but a transportation token will do.



We know what a castle looked like in the Middle Ages: high walls, towers and some buildings within the walls. We know what a Roman fortified camp looked like: walls or palisades, watchtowers. But do we have any idea of what a fortress looked like in-between? Old texts speak of halls and we know they were high enough for an upper part, but did not have wall-to-wall floors. We suspect that at best they used Roman buildings, repaired with wattle and daub, at worst they were made of beams, wattle and daub and moss, so they disappeared. Stories like "Arthur's castle" Tintagel are (mainly Victorian) fantasies.

Oakham, built in stone, gives you an idea of what a strong place may have looked like in the days of Alfred the Great. Its (dry?) moat and palisade or wall have gone, but the great hall remains. With some fantasy, you can also see how such great halls developed into Romanesque churches. An instant favourite...

Peter
« Last Edit: August 14, 2010, 08:21:51 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK national transport tokens
« Reply #21 on: August 14, 2010, 05:51:19 PM »
Conwy castle is a huge affair of walls and towers. It started out as a royal fortress to keep the Welsh in their place and ended up as an empty hulk in the English civil war.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK national transport tokens
« Reply #22 on: August 14, 2010, 06:34:05 PM »
The Leyland Lion LT1, built 1926-1940 was the first of four bus types of that name. Here is the story of one being fixed up again.

In all aspects, this token looks like the earlier 20p tokens. It is, however, a 50p token of he same size as the "castles" series.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK national transport tokens
« Reply #23 on: August 14, 2010, 07:53:04 PM »
Here is a type of public transportation we haven't seen yet, a minibus. Though nominally a Mercedes type, it was built only in Britain by Mercedes UK. The body on the picture is slightly different from the one on the token. This is a 20p token.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK national transport tokens
« Reply #24 on: August 14, 2010, 08:10:07 PM »
Here are the Zodiac 10p tokens. One (Gemini) is missing and another (Aquarius) was shown before in this thread. Special thanks to andyg for collecting these (including most of the tokens shown earlier) tokens for me.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: UK national transport tokens
« Reply #25 on: August 14, 2010, 08:13:35 PM »
These are attractive tokens. I have a vague memory of reading an article about them some decades ago (the transport ones, not the Zodiac-themed ones), either in Coin News or Coin Monthly. Apparently the author of the piece went to visit the Birmingham Mint, where they were supposedly designed and minted, and he was presented with a set of them as a token(!) of his visit. Unfortunately I never kept a copy of that article, and I wonder if AJG, who apparently knows a bit about the subject, has any knowledge of where they were actually produced?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

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Offline andyg

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Re: UK national transport tokens
« Reply #26 on: August 14, 2010, 09:19:32 PM »
NC Midi,

NC stands for Northern Counties a coach builder in the North of England, they built bodywork on top of pre prepared truck chassis bought from another company, in this case from Dodge.
As far as I know the Mercedes (is that a 709?) had Dormobile conversions.
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline andyg

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Re: UK national transport tokens
« Reply #27 on: August 14, 2010, 09:43:34 PM »
Conwy castle is a huge affair of walls and towers. It started out as a royal fortress to keep the Welsh in their place and ended up as an empty hulk in the English civil war.

Peter

I should point out the the Bridge in front of the picture is not actually part of the castle, it is a suspension bridge built by Thomas Telford in 1826 to carry the coach road to Holyhead, for the ferry to Ireland. It was one of the first suspension bridges - It would have made a nice subject for the token...  Next to it on the picture below is Robert Stephenson's tubular rail bridge, built in 1848 it was another first being the first bridge of this design.  Robert Stephenson was the son of the more well known George Stephenson, of 'Rocket' fame, Another potential subject for the token - but instead we got the castle.....
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline andyg

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Re: UK national transport tokens
« Reply #28 on: August 14, 2010, 09:49:44 PM »
These are attractive tokens. I have a vague memory of reading an article about them some decades ago (the transport ones, not the Zodiac-themed ones), either in Coin News or Coin Monthly. Apparently the author of the piece went to visit the Birmingham Mint, where they were supposedly designed and minted, and he was presented with a set of them as a token(!) of his visit. Unfortunately I never kept a copy of that article, and I wonder if AJG, who apparently knows a bit about the subject, has any knowledge of where they were actually produced?

Not a clue as to who manufactured them, I'm not even sure if they are still being manufactured.

The first 50p has the Leyland Lion, moving onto the Castles series then to the National Tranport logo.
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

translateltd

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Re: UK national transport tokens
« Reply #29 on: August 14, 2010, 10:04:17 PM »
The Leyland Lion LT1, built 1926-1940 was the first of four bus types of that name. Here is the story of one being fixed up again.

In all aspects, this token looks like the earlier 20p tokens. It is, however, a 50p token of he same size as the "castles" series.

Peter

Interesting item - all the more in that the representation of the vehicle displays the same "clay model" problems that I mentioned in reference to the Austrian 5 Euro yesterday.