Author Topic: Wonders of modern postal service  (Read 7175 times)

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Offline Pabitra

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Re: Wonders of modern postal service
« Reply #60 on: April 14, 2015, 04:35:50 PM »
An image of the packet would be of great interest.

Online capnbirdseye

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Re: Wonders of modern postal service
« Reply #61 on: April 14, 2015, 04:59:19 PM »
An image of the packet would be of great interest.


Here it is, I blocked out my address & phone number they also put on,  also covered sellers i.d
Vic

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Wonders of modern postal service
« Reply #62 on: April 14, 2015, 05:29:41 PM »
In other words, some one in USA could decode that the place existed in UK.

What if it had landed in a place where the employee of receiving  country was as knowledgable as sending country's employees :-)

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Wonders of modern postal service
« Reply #63 on: April 14, 2015, 06:22:31 PM »
Not really true.
A well designed system should not expect users to know intricacies of internal systems.
Designing such system is not difficult.
In late 70s, the International Trunk Subscriber Dialling was standardised by ITU! Telecom version of UPU.
Each country was assigned a code...

The parallel with telecoms doesn't really work. It doesn't matter what international agreements have been reached or how many digits phone numbers should have - if you dial wrong, you won't get through. You will have direct evidence of your error immediately and will either redial correctly or seek help if you don't understand what the problem is. Either way, apart from inconvenience and time, you probably won't experience material loss.

With the post, you don't know whether something's gone wrong until it doesn't get delivered, which in many cases is too late as the item has got irretrievably lost. There is no feedback on how you address your package at the point at which it leaves your hands, unlike with a phone call. The more detail you can give, even if it's not in the destination country's standard format, the more likely it is your letter will arrive as intended. As I mentioned above in the UK you can send to a house number and postcode, but if the latter is wrong even by one digit or letter, it will get irretrievably lost. Write the whole address in a way a human postal worker can understand, and a wrong postcode will be overridden by the rest of the address (admittedly possibly after a delay).

Furthermore, phone numbers are numeric only, and all technical systems in the world use the same number system even if for certain more literary uses non-western numerals are used in some places. Addresses are alphanumeric and are subject to linguistic and alphabetic ignorance on the part of senders and deliverers/sorters.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Wonders of modern postal service
« Reply #64 on: April 14, 2015, 07:17:04 PM »
In Belgium, every resident is allotted a 11 digit number.
In central database, it has my current postal address and the same must be updated if I move to another location.
If Belgium was given a 3 digit code, My postal address will become a 14 digit code.

In a case of letter, I can send my 14 digit code to the sender and rest everything can be taken care by linked computers.

After all, my bank account is also nothing but a series of codes, duly recorded in chip of the credit card I carry.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Wonders of modern postal service
« Reply #65 on: April 14, 2015, 07:39:58 PM »
In Belgium, every resident is allotted a 11 digit number.
In central database, it has my current postal address and the same must be updated if I move to another location.

Sweden has a similar system, and I have to have a postal address linked to my personnummer (10 digits, 6 of which are my DoB) to which official communications such as tax declarations, voting cards, speeding tickets and suchlike can be sent. But that doesn't preclude my having further addresses if I wish. I may choose to get an online retailer to send a parcel to my work because I will reliably be there to sign for it. People may choose to get certain mail sent to their parents' (not relevant to me as my parents live in a different country, but in principle). Certain classes of temporary visitor (students, tourists, people on shorter business secondments) don't need a Swedish personnummer but still need to be able to receive mail.

And even with the ubiquity of the Swedish personnummer I would not particularly want it plastered over every last mailing I receive for all and sundry to see, take note of and attempt to empty my bank account with.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Wonders of modern postal service
« Reply #66 on: April 15, 2015, 02:09:27 AM »
And even with the ubiquity of the Swedish personnummer I would not particularly want it plastered over every last mailing I receive for all and sundry to see, take note of and attempt to empty my bank account with.

This number is so ubiquitous that no one attempts to hide it at all. One has to show this card every time you book a train or bus ticket, take delivery of registered articles or items received from a courier or even when you pick up the medicine from the chemist for which insurance company is paying. Entry to local events and museums where one gets free entry being a local resident, also needs the card to be presented. The number is linked to the bank account number but not really used for operating it.

I think we need to be understand this modern systems and try to adopt it to make old system like postal system to be improved.

After all we all participate in this forum where our identity, location, messages are all criss crossing the
world spanning network using some bits of addresses, stored in some computer with open access to other computers.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Wonders of modern postal service
« Reply #67 on: April 15, 2015, 09:38:31 PM »
After all we all participate in this forum where our identity, location, messages are all criss crossing the
world spanning network using some bits of addresses, stored in some computer with open access to other computers.

Fortunately not so. What is known about your identity is what you give away yourself. You can use any handle you please, you can hide your email address. The only thing administrators know with a degree of certainty of all members is in which country they are, but even in that field, there are errors. We do not store information on our members. We discourage practices that provide enough information about our members to identify them and we remove email addresses from posts.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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Wonders of modern postal service
« Reply #68 on: April 17, 2015, 05:44:37 PM »
Latest experience of India Post :D

A friend of mine sent me a letter from Greece on April 6th (coin ordered on behalf of a friend). The letter arrived in Mumbai on April 8, released by customs the next day (April 9). Everything went well up to this stage. However, the person at the sorting center forwarded it to city with the pin code abc3de instead of abc2de (mistake in 4th digit of pin code) on the same day, which is hardly 5 kilometers from where I live. The wrong recipient (post office) received the letter on April 13th, found that it's not their letter and they forwarded it to my city on the same day. It took another 3 days to travel ~5km and finally received the letter yesterday! In short, it took more time to travel 5 km than to travel few thousand kilometers (Athens => Mumbai)! :o

Aditya
Caution. The low-hanging fruits are still there maybe for a reason.