Author Topic: All aboard in the US  (Read 10004 times)

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Offline brandm24

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Re: All aboard in the US
« Reply #30 on: January 04, 2020, 12:03:47 PM »
The Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company (PRT) came about in 1907. It merged away to become the City Transit Division, becoming the Philadelphia Transportation Company (PTC), now the unhappily named SEPTA (Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority), since this is the plural of septum, a yuckie medical term. I am grateful there is no Reno and Environs Community Transportation Authority (RECTA).

The first token can only be dated after 1907, because of the PRT monogram, while the second, with its PTC monogram could only have been struck after 1968. Both are 16.4 mm, opening the possibility that the older ones could still have been used alongside the new ones, though the older token is 1.6 gram and the newer one 1.9 gram.

Peter
You got a chuckle out of me on that one, Peter. I'll never ride SEPTA again. Nobody here ever equated the name with septum as far as I know. A lot of colorful language is used to describe the system, but no "yuckie" medical terms. YIKES!

Bruce
« Last Edit: January 04, 2020, 08:19:33 PM by Figleaf »
Bruce

Offline brandm24

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Re: All aboard in the US
« Reply #31 on: January 04, 2020, 12:16:11 PM »
Seattle Transit was established in 1939. This smiley token is remarkable for probably being the only local railway or bus token that features trees and a mountain so prominently. The present successor of the company is called Metro Transit. I can't read what's below the scenery of the upper picture (Becket?). It may be the name of the producer of the tokens or the machines that take them.

Peter
I found this history of the Seattle transit systems, but came up with nothing as to the signature on your token.. Apparently, Metro Transit came about in 1973.Seattle Transit System is ushered out of existence and Metro Transit ushered in

Bruce
                                           
Bruce

Offline brandm24

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Re: All aboard in the US
« Reply #32 on: January 04, 2020, 12:21:15 PM »
Sorry, I missed the earlier posts that identified the signer.

Bruce
Bruce

Offline Figleaf

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Re: All aboard in the US
« Reply #33 on: January 04, 2020, 08:21:47 PM »
Glad you had fun, Bruce. :laughing:

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

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Re: All aboard in the US
« Reply #34 on: March 05, 2020, 10:28:25 AM »
Since were talking about US transit tokens, I thought I'd add this one to the thread.

 The Chicago Transit Authority piece is interesting in that there's a "connection" to an American rock band. The band, Chicago, started out in 1967 and was called at the time Chicago Transit Authority. The two "authority's" got along famously until about 1969 when the transit people decided they wanted their name back. When they threatened legal action to do just that the music people changed their name to Chicago. Chicago, knowing full well that they were more popular than the transit system, probably did so with a smile on their face. You can't buy that kind of publicity.

The token itself measures 16.5 mm and weighs in at 1.68 g. It's listed in both the TokenCatalog and  Atwood-Coffee references.

Bruce
Bruce

Offline Figleaf

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Re: All aboard in the US
« Reply #35 on: March 05, 2020, 11:15:15 AM »
Frankly, I'd never heard of the band Chicago. It looks like its former name had become a dirty word. ;) Then again, you may never have heard of the group Boom Chicago, though Seth Meyers (and Amber Ruffin) may be a known quantity to you.

Glad you are adding to this thread. It is still very short in view of what's out there.

Peter

Here is a Boom Chicago product for you. Enjoy.

« Last Edit: March 05, 2020, 10:02:33 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

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Re: All aboard in the US
« Reply #36 on: March 05, 2020, 06:12:08 PM »
Well, were even up then. I've never heard of Boom Chicago, but I must admit it frightened me initially. On any given night, or day for that matter, there's a lot of boomin'...aka, gunfire...in that city. Unfortunately, it's known as the murder capital of the country last time I heard. A sad state of affairs I'm afraid.

I don't think Chicago did a lot of world tours, so it's not surprising that you haven't heard of them. They were hugely successful here for many years unlike the transit system they were initially named after. They still tour today although many of the original members have gone their own way.

I have more transit tokens I'll have to dig out and take pictures of. I never seriously collected them, but picked up a small number over the years. At one time I had the complete set of Atwood-Coffee references but donated them to my coin club several years ago.

Bruce
Bruce

Offline brandm24

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Re: All aboard in the US
« Reply #37 on: March 08, 2020, 12:17:28 PM »
I bought a small number of transportation tokens at an antiques fair in Atlantic City 20 years ago. I paid about 65 Cents apiece for them. This is one of them.

N.O.T.& L. Co. stands for the Northern Ohio Traction & Light Co. Originally known as the Akron, Bedford & Cleveland Railroad when it was formed in 1895 initially offered only train service. Funny thing about the line was its initials, A.B.C. Railroad. Someone decided to call it the Alphabet Railroad and it became commonly known as such. They offered service between Akron and Cleveland for 50 cents with 9 stops between.

In 1906 after several mergers, the N.O.T. & L. company was formed. Trolley service was added at some point, and buses later in 1923. The lines operated until 1932 when the company was renamed Ohio Edison. Apparently, they were only a power company by then. Today the company is known as FirstEnergy.

The token is 16.5 mm and weighs 1.3 g. In addition to the Canton piece pictured here, I came across tokens from the company with a center A for Akron and a center M for Massilon. Apparently, each stop on the line had a unique token allowing passage to that particular station.

Bruce
Bruce

Offline Figleaf

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Re: All aboard in the US
« Reply #38 on: March 09, 2020, 08:49:36 PM »
Thank you, Bruce.

The developments follow what happened in Britain pretty closely, except for N.O.T.& L. Co. running trains before. Otherwise, you see early local public transport in the form of privately-owned horse-drawn trams succeeded by municipal electric trams around 1900 that were replaced by buses over a few decades around 1920 as buses went from slow, fuming, noisy contraptions that fell apart at every turn to reliable and more flexible, but still slow, fuming and noisy. The irony is that electric trams are making a forceful come-back in many European cities and they were never gone in some cities from Amsterdam to Hong Kong.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

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Re: All aboard in the US
« Reply #39 on: March 09, 2020, 09:41:25 PM »
Thank you, Bruce.

The developments follow what happened in Britain pretty closely, except for N.O.T.& L. Co. running trains before. Otherwise, you see early local public transport in the form of privately-owned horse-drawn trams succeeded by municipal electric trams around 1900 that were replaced by buses over a few decades around 1920 as buses went from slow, fuming, noisy contraptions that fell apart at every turn to reliable and more flexible, but still slow, fuming and noisy. The irony is that electric trams are making a forceful come-back in many European cities and they were never gone in some cities from Amsterdam to Hong Kong.

Peter
The American transport system is sadly lacking in many areas, especially in rail transit. A good example is a light rail system built in South Jersey to service the river towns (east bank of the Delaware River)  stretching from Camden to Trenton mid-state. People fought tooth-and-nail to squash the idea because of the fear of increased crime and other considerations. Even today it's not heavily used and basically has been an economic disappointment. Americans love their cars and the habit is nearly impossible to break. I love my car as much as anyone else but there honestly aren't many alternatives. I would use more public transportation if it were available but, sadly, its not in many areas.

Bruce
Bruce

Offline brandm24

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Re: All aboard in the US
« Reply #40 on: March 09, 2020, 10:03:47 PM »
Here's a good example of a token from a small regional system that basically served Harrisburg, PA. Valley Transportation was based in nearby LeMoyne and operated only from 1938 until 1970 when it became the Harrisburg Railways Company.This is another piece from my 20 year old "hoard".

There are two main geographical areas of Harrisburg, the West Shore and the East Shore. Very territorial, the citizens are. If you live on the West Shore you just don't shop or eat at any East Shore places. I lived outside of the city for a short while many years ago. One nice thing about the city though was that rush hour only lasted for about a half hour. Where I live now, it goes on and on. Anyway, Valley Transportation served the West Shore. I don't know what they did on the other side of the river...walked mostly, I suppose.

The original trolley lines were abandoned in 1938 when Valley Transportation succeeded Valley Railways. From what I understand, VT offered bus service only. While a small transportation network, there's an  interesting story behind it. I've attached a link.History of Transit in the Harrisburg Area | CAT: Capital Area Transit | Page 6

Bruce
                                           

Bruce

Offline brandm24

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Re: All aboard in the US
« Reply #41 on: March 23, 2020, 04:07:59 PM »
Here's a token from a more "exotic" location that I thought added interest to it.

The line originally known as the Honolulu Rapid Transit and Land Co. was founded on June 6, 1898, the same day Hawaii was annexed by the United States. They began streetcar service in 1901 which continued until 1941. Bus service was initiated in 1925 and trolleys from 1937 until 1957.

The line was bought by land developer Harry Weinberg in 1955 who operated it until it was purchased by the city in 1970. During Weinberg's tenure as owner the operation suffered from several strikes and work stoppages that crippled service for months at a time. Finally fed up with the turmoil, Honolulu Mayor Frank Fasi brokered its sale to the city when it was briefly run by a management company called Mass Transit Lines, Ltd. Shortly after it was re-branded The Bus, a name still used today.

The token itself is 16 mm and weighs 1.6 g. The material is zinc or copper/nickel depending on who you talk to. Many of the early pieces show heavy corrosion because of the token's metallic composition's reaction to the damp, salty climate of Hawaii.

The attached picture shows a streetcar in downtown Honolulu c1930s.

Bruce
Bruce