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Cartaux - engraver

Started by africancoins, March 21, 2010, 01:43:10 AM

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redwine

10c CARTAUX PARIS
7.7g
29mm
Brass
Medal aligned

What a star  ;D
Always willing to trade.  See my profile for areas of interest.

malj1

The star in various forms also appears on several of the British denominations for use in these machines; including those marked "To Be Spent in the House" I don't know of any significance though.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Figleaf

Maybe no significance at all. A 5-pointed star is just easy to construct. Draw a circle and mark five points, each 72° apart. Connect the five dots with straight lines, skipping one dot every time, so if the dots were numbered 1 to 5, the lines would run from 1 to 3, on to 5, on to 2, on to 4, back to 1. The 13-lobed figure around it is a lot harder to construct.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Horacio

Greetings from Montevideo, Uruguay. This is my first post.
I am researching Mr. Cartaux because I found some Uruguayan tokens made for him.
I red all the messages some weeks ago and I found some contradictions and data that not convinced me.
Now, after two months of investigation, I can assert the following:
F. Cartaux is Francis Cartaux, not Freres Cartaux as a member said.
Cartaux, engraver and tokens minter,  was located in 6 cité Dupetit-Thouars, París.
And the symbol above the letters F C in the triangle is a burrel, a quarter of tun (an ancient measure of volumen).

I don't know if some members read the subject yet. If there is someone interested, I can provide all the information and sources.

It is a pleasure for me to write in this fórum.

Figleaf

Bienvenido a "mundo de las monedas", Horacio. Yes, Mr. Cartaux was a busy man. The address you found is in central Paris. The shop is not very large. It may have been for sales only. Making tokens is a noisy business and Parisians love to complain, so this may well have been the address of the shop.

We like research. Please post your sources. I am sure there will be an interest. Tun is English, not French. A quarter tun would be a hogshead and a barrel would be 1/8 tun (source). These are measures, not objects, so I am a little confused. Or did you mean to say that the object is a barrel?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

malj1

Quote from: Horacio on July 29, 2014, 10:23:10 PM

And the symbol above the letters F C in the triangle is a burrel, a quarter of tun (an ancient measure of volumen).

I don't know if some members read the subject yet. If there is someone interested, I can provide all the information and sources.


Yes I am very interested in this useful information and wish to know much more, so your information and sources would be most appreciated.

 

We had wondered if the design was a barrel.

 

Here is another type with just a round dot in the triangle with the FC.


Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Horacio

Peter and malj1,

Sorry for my English. My language is Spanish.
Yes, the symbol is a barrel, "a quartaut" in French. "A quartaut" is an object and a measure too.
I have a nice picture of triangle.... it is from a Catemu Chile UNC token. But it is too large and I can not attach it.
Here you can see a postal card of Cartaux.

malj1

#97
I found a nice image of his shop at that address:


I wonder if you have Microsoft Office Picture Manager? this has a very simple to use image size reduction method.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.


Horacio

Well, I can reduce the size.

malj1

That is good, the best image of the barrel that I have seen.

Thank you too for the link it is perfect.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Horacio

Quote from: malj1 on July 30, 2014, 04:42:27 AM
I found a nice image of his shop at that address:


I wonder if you have Microsoft Office Picture Manager? this has a very simple to use image size reduction method.

Do you think this building is from 1900's? I think it is a 1940-50 building, constructed post Cartaux.

malj1

#102
I think it would be much older, possibly it was renovated after the war but the chimneys suggest 1900 or earlier.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

redwine

Quote from: Horacio on July 30, 2014, 04:49:36 AM
And here you are the key information: a link from the French Culture and Education Ministry. You can see all the information about FRANCIS CARTAUX. Tomorrow I'll try to attach the picture of the barrel. Good night.

Many thanks Horacio!  8)
Always willing to trade.  See my profile for areas of interest.

malj1

A look in Google street-view shows the whole street appears to be of 19th century construction.

Unfortunately this is just beyond the limits of street-view and I have zoomed in to compensate for this.

Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.